phonics assessment RDG 3113 - -u_w Early Lit 1 Phonics...

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Unformatted text preview: --u""-‘-—-—-—.._w---—-—"“‘—* ’ ’ ' ' March 19, 2015 Early Lit. 1 Phonics Assessment Mariah is in kindergarten and reading below the average in her class. I chose to do the Letter Name/ Sound Assessment with Mariah. She gets frustrated with the assessment so we broke it into two sessions on different practicum days. I talked with Mrs. Carpenter about how she gets the children to recognize letters for her during assessments and just for fun; she taught me an engaging way. She had three large pieces of construction paper with the alphabet (capital and lower case) scattered throughout. The students would come to her table to play a “game” using the alphabet tables. The game starts with Mrs. Carpenter giving each of the students their own dinosaurs and they get to choose the letter their dinosaur goes on. She then picks up the dinosaur and says whether it is a capital or lower case letter, the sound it makes, and a word it starts with. Next, Mrs. Carpenter gets to place the students dinosaurs on letters of her choice and the students pick them up and tell Mrs. Carpenter about their letter. She then writes in their binders what they tell her. I thought this was such a neat and exciting way to get Mariah excited about working with the alphabet and for it not to seem like an assessment. I went home and made my own chart and bought two My Little Ponies (blue and pick), so that we could play the game together. Once I got to the school and Mariah saw her new game, she was excited to get to be the only one to play it. ’2 I focused on just the lower case letters because she is more familiar with those and they do not stress her out badly. She got the lethirEgdsjor A, M, Q, U, Y, B, F, J, R, C, G, K, O, S, D, H, and T on the very first try. She sang “Who Let the Letters Out” a few times to freshen up her memory on the sounds for I, N, V, Z, W, L, X. The letter name that was the most liwitr‘td‘ “- challenging for Mariah was the E and the hardest sound was the P. She made it through the P sounds and names smoothly but the word part was extremely hard for her. As we were going through the assessment I could tell that every time I asked her to tell me a word that started with that letter, she shut down. I do not believe that she could not come up with anything but just that she did not have confidence to express the words she was thinking. I think that she is so scared to mess up or say the wrong thing that she does want to say anything at all. To try and break her out of her shell, I have been bringing a treasure bag filled with stickers and goodies to let her pick through when she gets it right. It seems to be working a little bit. Her strengths are letter name, recognition, and sound. Her weaknesses are blending the sounds together to make words and sounding them out to read. I believe splitting the assessment into two sessions really helped her because she did not have enough time to let herself get off track or frustrated. If we would have tried to do it all in one day, it would have been difficult. Once she begins to second guess herself, she cannot focus. Mariah did amazing with the concepts of print assessment. We read through KYou Give a Mouse a Cookie just for fun and I asked her all the questions about how to read correctly from the assessment sheet. She understood the front of the book and what was on it. She told me about the author and illustrator, as well. She knew that the words told a story. When we started reading the 0’ You Give a Mouse a Cookie story, she knew to start at read left to right throughout the story. She could point out capital letters and discuss words with me. Concepts About Print Kindergarten Concepts About Print Score: [1 Use script when administering this test. Scoring: \/ : correct response 0 = incorrect or no response Comment u Print contains message . MW WW Ema period, km SW did rim vhritisimo‘ ii WM. _ LBW WM M sure. 4. Which way to go 5. Return sweep to ieft 6. Meaning of a period 79. Word-by—word matching 10. One letter; two ietters 11. One word; two words 12. First/last letter of a word Letter Name/Sound Score Sheet Capital Letters Student Name: Teacher Name: Date of Initial Assessment: A: TY DUB-'19; Date of Retest: — Emmi-W Date of Retest: mm m m gfiggPfiflg’WéPNr‘ <Ilzr—1'tm-(cog-m). 4%". :ngae‘é \K I < K s 2 _|. .b. N —l- wk 5" 9". CD 0 O ‘3" ‘E 16.6 17- ' 0 N‘ 9 O O D 0 O O O 0 0 0 018.0 . Q - 20.W - 0 0 22.H m 9’ f. “"5 24.P 25.T > 25.x ; 0 < PIQW rum-aim- :35wa awe. ifiwer' (1.3M: €_,Qli£‘_€1yw fiéb+1$§fpbtfmt sheer R06 3113 Assessment Rubics Students' Name: ‘_ . s 1: fig p Yourfocuschild’sgrade: l5— ; L f Unacceptable ‘Acceptable a? : _._.1_ «at. It ‘ "k I n. K I: a _ V v‘ n 3, Required Administer partial Administer all required Administer all the required 5: Assessments required assessments with the assessments with the focus w" l is, a") (phonological assessments with focus child child and perform "if v f 'awareness/ the focus child recommended assessments a.” r: honics, __}.7/ 5 l L? res Spelling, or (0—9) (10—13) (14/@+ bonus points) i.” jag” K, a“ , ,. w ,9 Words ’ v ,1}: £5 points) I ‘2‘; Assessment I The administration The administration is The administration is i administration: . is inappropriate for appropriate for the age extremely appropriate for . 35—7 3" the age of focus of focus child, valid, and the age of focus child, valid, gig/5’75— child, invalid, did includes how the and includes detailed (if (10 points) not include how assessment is information on how the the assessment is administered assessment is administered W ' l_ administered (0—5) (6—8) (9-19),) -41» .5 Assessment Include incomplete, Include adequate results Include complete, detailed results results (3—4} results q. 5 paints) (0—3) S? Original ‘ No original Only partial original All required, original 4:? recording recording recording submitted prding submitted 5 x (5 pts) submitted 0 1-4 1' 5/ s— :7” Interpretation Interpretation of Most of the assessment Interpretation of the the assessment interpretations is assessment results is *1; results is included and accurate complete, accurate. (10 points) incomplete, (6—8) Strengths and weaknesses inaccurate (0—5) are well defined®10l Mechanics: Candidates misuse Candidates use English Candidates exhibit a high level Sentence English language arts language arts conventions of competence in the use of structure, conventions in in written language forms English language arts grammar, written language (3 in describing the students( conventions in written spelling, or more errors) two or less technical cliscoursle’.'§\\j ' " punctuation, (0—2) errors) (3—4) “J” * coherence {5 points) ...
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