brothers karamazov Lecture 8 10.13 - Ivan is engaged in a...

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Ivan is engaged in a duel with Alyosha’s soulotrying to argue against Alyosha’s faith; trying to bring Alyosha to his sideoargument against the goodness of God’s worldooffers a series of accounts of child abuse: all real, all important in Russian press, a few were actually brought to trial (Dostoevsky was actually one of the best crime reporters)offers a specific story (some of which the readers would have recognized) and then the kind of justifications that openly talk about the goodness of the world → then compares them and says which has more power to you: this suffering child or this philosophical explanation?clear that any explanation will seem thin compared to the particular suffering of a childopg. 264-5animals don’t dream up new ways of inflicting pain on each other; they don’t use their imagination for a new way of “artistic” torturenot just the action but the viewing the action is part of the actionpart of the torture is the mother’s viewing of the torture → doubles the painchild also watches mother’s being tortured → child is also torturedTurks have their form of torture, Swiss have their form of torture → each culture has their own particular form of torture;they’re all ultimately evil, but not evil in the same wayopg. 267: close connection between sexuality to the infliction of painseveral cultures have come up with their highly elaborate ways of torture → always have an element of sexuality and sensuality → what does this show about our nature?is it any wonder that we inflict so much pain?opg. 268-9sense of complete helplessness of the victimpeople torture because it’s fun to torture: the more helpless (physical&psychological) your victim is, the more fun it iscommon theme: this is what Fyodor loves about Alyosha’s mother: it’s fun for him to shock her because of how innocent she is“dear kind God”: phrase that Ivan keeps using with increasing ironyjustification: we have to have evil in order to have good: we’re better than animals because we’re moral and they’re notstart out as naïve animals who don’t know good/evil but in some sort of paradise → eat the fruit and we fall → but in the end, we will rise up even higher because it includes the knowledge of good/eviloin the end, all the suffering is justified because without it, we wouldn’t know otherwiseocalled “the fortunate fall” in Christianity but also present in other religionsIvan’s argument against justification: why should man know that diabolical good/evil when it costs so much?

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