brothers karamazov Lecture 5 10.4 - Miusov paradox(pg 73 o...

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Miusov: “paradox” (pg 73) o meaning that Miusov has in mind: a belief that is contrary to perceived opinion and therefore would have to be false; seems to defy common sense ex> idea that began in 18 th century that if people look out for their own prosperity/self-interest, society as a whole would be better off o another meaning: something that is self-contradictory with seemingly no way of resolving it ex> ancient Greece: there was a man from Crete that said “everything spoken by a man from Crete is a lie” aka the lier’s paradox same thing: this sentence is false o assume: this is true…. result: it is false o assume: this is false… result: it is true o logical paradoxes are very common and they have a psychological correlate: sometimes called the “double bind” – a statement accompanied by a meta-statement which contradicts it ex> a mother doesn’t love her child but doesn’t want to admit that she doesn’t love her child mother: I don’t love you→child draws away→mother: why are you drawing away? don’t you know I love you?→child draws close→mother: why are you drawing so close? don’t behave that way may be accompanied by “don’t believe me when I say…” ex> of metastatement: “I’m only joking when I say…” could also say “I’m only joking when I say I’m joking”→Ivan says this as a way not to be pinned down o genre: rhetorical paradox often contain lots of logical paradoxes one of the ways that students were taught to speak well was to “defend the indefensible”, or “praise the unvenerable” – talk about the advantage of being stupid/ugly/poor/unpopular/hated. we have hundreds of these paradoxes from the ancient world o Dostoevsky loved using these paradoxes way of exploring psychological complexity moral issues ex> of psychological issue: Ivan doesn’t have to commit himself chapter “Grand Inquisitor” is a great paradox immediately after Miusov paraphrases Ivan, Dmitri interjects; Father Paissy answers “yes”; Dmitri says “I’ll remember it” o when a soldier says to you “ do you really mean that crime/violence are bad? huh, I’ll remember it” → might not want to be around him when he’s angry… he’s ready, apparently, to translate what, for Ivan, is simply a philosophical idea into something to act upon, and take it to the consequences o “you mean it’s ok to murder someone for my self-interest if I don’t get caught?” – it’s

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