SOCI 1 Syllabus UCSD Fall 2013 - Sociology 1 Introduction to Sociology Fall 2013 Instructor Laura Pecenco Course Syllabus Instructor E-mail

SOCI 1 Syllabus UCSD Fall 2013 - Sociology 1 Introduction...

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Unformatted text preview: Sociology 1: Introduction to Sociology Fall 2013 Instructor: Laura Pecenco Course Syllabus Instructor E-­‐mail: [email protected] Course Website: ted.ucsd.edu Class Meetings: Tu/Th, 2:00-­‐3:20 pm Classroom: Galbraith Hall 242 Office Hours: Tu, 12:00-­‐2:00 pm Office: Social Sciences Building 491 Overview This course will introduce you to sociology, an analytical approach to studying society. We begin by discussing some classical ways of thinking about society and its relationship to the individual. We will master the concepts of social structures (durable patterns of relationships, such as institutions and social networks) and cultural structures (patterns of broadly shared, taken-­‐for-­‐granted ideas and values), which shape life chances and identities. We will then turn to empirical research on these topics, with a focus on how life chances in the United States vary by the dimensions of socio-­‐economic class, race/ethnicity and citizenship status, gender, and sexuality. Our analyses will then turn to intersections of these dimensions in the lives of college students. • Both lectures and discussion sections are required for this course. Teaching Assistants Christine Payne (Monday 11 am, 12 pm), Julia Rogers (Monday 2 pm, 3 pm), Heidi Schneider (Tuesday 4 pm, 5 pm), David Pinzur (Wednesday 9 am, 10 am), Erica Bender (Wednesday 3 pm, 4 pm), Lauren Olsen (Thursday 8 am, 9 am), Zach Leffers (Friday 10 am, 11 am) • TAs will provide you with their contact information and office hours. Course Readings Readings should be completed prior to the lecture for which they are assigned. Please bring copies of the readings to lecture and section. Required Text Introduction to Sociology: Analysis of the Social World, 2nd ed. (2013), edited by Mary Blair-­‐Loy. The book is available through University Readers' student e-­‐commerce store. It is helpful to have your own copy to keep up with course readings and to have during the open-­‐book, in-­‐class exams. 1. Log on to 2. Create an account or log in if you have an existing account to purchase. 3. Instructions will guide you through the ordering process. Payment can be made by major credit card or electronic check. 4. Access your partial e-­‐book (free 20% PDF) by logging into your account and clicking “My Digital Materials” to get started on your readings right away. • If you have difficulties, email [email protected] or call 800.200.3908 ext. 503. • There are also 2 copies of the textbook available on reserve at Geisel Library. Other Readings Additional readings will be available on the Ted course website (ted.ucsd.edu). 1 Course Policies and Requirements Grading: • Midterm: 35% • Final: 40% • Section work (TA will provide specific requirements): 25% Classroom Environment: Respect is of the utmost importance in this class. Any comments or actions that instigate or contribute to a hostile environment will not be tolerated. This classroom is a place where claims can be explored, challenged, and argued for and against without fear of oppression and/or reprisal by your peers or the instructor. Any individual who, as a result of their words and/or behavior, silences their classmates will be held accountable. Cell phones and other such devices must be turned off. Statement of Academic Integrity: Students are expected to do their own work, as outlined in the UCSD Policy on Academic Integrity published in the UCSD General Catalog: “Cheating will not be tolerated, and any student who engages in suspicious conduct will be confronted and subjected to the disciplinary process. Cheaters will receive a failing grade on the assignment or the exam and/or in the entire course. They may also be suspended from UCSD. Academic misconduct includes but is not limited to: • Cheating, such as using "crib notes" or copying answers from another student during the exam, modifying a graded exam and returning it for a new grade, or submitting the same paper or assignment for two or more different courses unless authorized by the instructors concerned. • Plagiarism, such as using the writings or ideas of another person, either in whole or in part, without proper attribution to the author of the source. • Collusion, such as engaging in unauthorized collaboration on homework assignments or take home exams, completing for another student any part or the whole of an assignment or exam, or procuring, providing or accepting materials that contain questions or answers to an exam or assignment to be given at a subsequent time.” Resources are available at the Academic Integrity Office ( -­‐ students/_organizations/academic-­‐integrity-­‐office/). Ted You are responsible for material posted on the Ted website (ted.ucsd.edu) for this course. Material will include the syllabus, some readings, and announcements. The username and password for Ted are the same as those for your UCSD ACS or ACMS e-­‐mail. If you do not know your UCSD e-­‐mail account info, you can find it in your registration packet or look it up here: . For technical help, see iwdc/password.shtml. Students with Disabilities: Students with disabilities are encouraged to speak with me at the beginning of the quarter to discuss any accommodations we should make to guarantee your full participation. Please also contact Beverly Bernhardt ([email protected]), the Sociology Department Disability Coordinator. Participation Participation is about more than simply attending class. Participation involves critically engaging with the course material, meaning coming to class prepared (having completed the reading, having thought about it, and being ready to talk about it). E-­‐mail Please include “Soc 1” in your subject heading. I will do my best to respond to e-­‐mail within 24 hours on weekdays. 2 Course Schedule Readings should be completed prior to the start of class. Please bring readings with you to lecture and section. This schedule is tentative and is subject to change. Week 0 Thursday, September 26 – Introduction to Course • No readings Week 1 Tuesday, October 1 – Theoretical Overview: Social and Cultural Structures and Life Chances • Blair-­‐Loy. “Introduction: Analyzing the Social and Cultural Structures that Shape our Lives.” • Farrelly. “Freshman Women at Duke University Battle 'Effortless Perfection.'” • Zirin. “NFL’s in Denial about Depression.” • Blair-­‐Loy. “Introduction: Analytical Lenses from the Classics: Durkheim, Weber, Marx.” Thursday, October 3 – Classical Theory • Durkheim. “Egoistic Suicide.” • Weber. “Spirit of Capitalism.” Week 2 Tuesday, October 8 – Classical Theory, continued • Marx . “The Communist Manifesto.” • Weber. "Class, Status, Party." Thursday, October 10 – Social Class: The American Dream or Bourdieu’s Theory of Social Reproduction? • Blair-­‐Loy. “Introduction: Social Class.” • Johnson. “The American Dream of Meritocracy.” • MacLeod. “Social Reproduction in Theoretical Perspective.” • Greif. “The Hipster in the Mirror.” • Bourdieu. “The Forms of Capital.” (Optional) Week 3 Tuesday, October 15 – Social Class Inequality • Lareau. “Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life.” • Isaacs, et al. “Getting Ahead or Losing Ground: Economic Mobility. . .” • Beutler. “Where’d All the Income Growth Go?” • Williams & Bushey. “The Three Faces of Work-­‐Family Conflict. UC Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco.” (Optional; Ted) Thursday, October 17 – Social Class Inequality, continued • Dodson. “The Moral Underground.” • Clark. “Houston Janitors Fight for Fair Pay in Economic Boom.” • Ehrenreich, Barbara. “Nickel-­‐and-­‐Dimed: On (not) Getting by in America.” (Ted) Week 4 Tuesday, October 22 – Review • No readings 3 Thursday, October 24 – Midterm Exam • In-­‐class essay exam • Bring a blue book. Week 5 Tuesday, October 29 – Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration: Overview • Blair-­‐Loy. “Introduction: Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration.” • Cornell and Hartmann. “Mapping the Terrain.” • Omi and Winant. “Racial Formation in the United States: From the 1960s to the 1990s.” (Ted) • Kantor. “Portrait of Change: …Many Faces in Extended 1st Family.” • Corrice. “Unconscious Bias…” • Wisnewski, J. Jeremy. “Race at the Rock: Race Cards, White Myths, and Postracial America.” (Ted) • Patrinos. “‘Race’ and the Human Genome.” (Optional; Ted) Thursday, October 31 – Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration: Asians, Asian Americans, African Americans • Kim. “The Racial Triangulation of Asian Americans.” • Kozol.”Still Separate, Still Unequal: America’s Educational Apartheid.” • Louie. “Parents’ Aspirations and Investment: . . . Chinese Americans.” (Optional) • Tomoskovic-­‐Devey and Warren. “Explaining and Eliminating Racial Profiling.” (Optional; Ted) Week 6 Tuesday, November 5 – Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration: Latinos • Cornelius. “Ambivalent Reception: Mass Public Responses to the ‘New’ Latino Immigration to the United States.” • Jimenez. “Immigrants in the United States: How Well are They Integrating into Society?” • Massey. “The Wall That Keeps Illegal Workers In.” • Cave. “A Generation Gap over Immigration.” • McGreevy & York. “Brown Signs California Dream Act.” Thursday, November 7 – Gender: Overview • Blair-­‐Loy. “Introduction: Gender.” • Kimmel. “Human Beings.” • Padavik and Reskin. “An Overview of Sex Inequality at Work.” • IWPR. “The Gender Wage Gay by Occupation.” Week 7 Tuesday, November 12 – Gender: Cultural Understanding and Work-­‐Family Interface • Blair-­‐Loy. “Competing Devotions.” • Aguilar. “The Myth of the Ideal Worker: New Workforce, Outdated Workplace.” • Parker-­‐Pope. “Now, Dad Feels as Stressed as Mom.” • Solomon, et al. “Money, Housework, Sex, and Conflict.” (Optional) Thursday, November 14 – Gender: Masculinity • Schilt. “Just One of the Guys? How Transmen Make Gender . . . “ • Barber. “The Well-­‐Coiffed Man.” 4 Week 8 Tuesday, November 19 – Intersections of Gender, Sexuality, Class, and Race and Ethnicity in College Life • Blair-­‐Loy. “Introduction: Intersections of Gender and Sexuality, Class, and Race/Ethnicity in College Life.” • Hamilton and Armstrong. “Gendered Sexuality in Young Adulthood.” • Armstrong , Hamilton, and England. 2010. “Is Hooking-­‐Up Bad for Young Women?” Contexts. American Sociological Association. (Optional; Ted) Thursday, November 21 – Intersectionality, continued • Ray & Rosow. “Getting Off and Getting Intimate: How Normative Institutional Arrangements Structure Black and White Fraternity Men’s Approaches Toward Women.” • Crenshaw. “Mapping the Margins.” (Optional; Ted) Week 9 Tuesday, November 26 • No class Thursday, November 28 – Happy Thanksgiving! • No class Week 10 Tuesday, December 3 – Intersections, continued • Mohamed & Fritsvold. “Overlooked Illegal Markets: Dealing Dope, College Style.” • Ong. “Body Projects of Young Women of Color in Physics: Intersections of Gender, Race, and Science.” Thursday, December 5 – Review • No readings Finals Week Thursday, December 12 – Final Exam • 3:00-­‐6:00 pm, Galbraith Hall 242 • Bring 2 blue books 5 ...
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