Goya - Romanticism: Goya 3/8/2008 1:47:00 PM Introduction:...

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Romanticism: Goya 08/03/2008 13:47:00 Introduction: Painted for over 60 years; mood and character changes over time; younger  depicted as intellectual and dressed in fine clothing; later years shows apathy  in clothing, tragic expression and more soulful more interest in mood than in  superficial details of dress Born in Aragon, father was goldsmith, mother from lower echelons of  aristocracy; went to Madrid and learned about art surrounding him; French  kings imported art from colonies Earlier paintings showed peasants in rural life; simple view of peasant life,  beautiful and charming without harsh realities; travels to major Art cities,  returns to Madrid and paints carefree peasant paintings for aristocracy QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Parasol , 1777 Commissioned by kings, queens, and wealthy nobility, began to decorate  palaces with oil paintings; usually with nature life, fishing scenes and young  love; meant to be delightful and enjoyment of wealthy Makes the mood delightful with lots of pastel colors and soft primary colors;  happy themes in Romantic to some extent Changes paintings in 1780s, tapestry cartoons become more ambiguous and  more metaphorical, begins to imply hidden meanings (social commentary  implied)
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QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Blind Man’s Bluff , 1788
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TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Mannequin , 1791 Reflects change in society; associates with people interested in French  enlightenment but at the same time paints for King; finds himself at  crossroads for many years; difficult to decipher meaning behind paintings,  whether advocating revolution or aristocracy unclear Criticizing society in Spain; subtle comment against dominance of women;  Goya ridiculing subservient role of men to women; how men are puppet-like  and made ridiculous by women; growing independence and waning male  authority (how they throw men around); puppet seen as flexible and no  backbone Ridiculing love in  Blidnman’s Bluff , man recklessly touching the next person  who’s going to be ridiculous; blinded by love
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Show Goya moving from mimesis to metaphor, implying through straw  puppets or blind man’s buff game ridicule and that aristocracy dominated by 
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course ART 2600 taught by Professor Bernstock, j during the Spring '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Goya - Romanticism: Goya 3/8/2008 1:47:00 PM Introduction:...

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