New rule look out

New rule look out - New rule: Look out, not in. Old rule:...

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New rule: Look out, not in. Old rule: Be lean and mean. By Betsy Morris , Fortune senior writer July 11 2006: 10:11 AM EDT NEW YORK (Fortune) -- In 1995, Jack Welch "went nuts," as he later put it, over Six Sigma, a set of methods for improving quality - plus a powerful way to reduce costs - that had been developed by Motorola ( Charts ) in the '80s. At GE's annual managers' meeting in Boca Raton the following January, he told his troops that embracing Six Sigma would be the company's most ambitious undertaking ever. GE's "best and the brightest" were redeployed to put the methods into action. And it worked. Welch would later write that Six Sigma helped drive operating margins to 18.9 percent in 2000 from 14.8 percent four years earlier. No wonder that after Welch adopted Six Sigma (to which he devotes a chapter of his book "Winning"), more than a quarter of the FORTUNE 200 followed suit. Yet not all firms were able to find the same magic. In fact, of 58 large companies that have announced Six Sigma programs, 91 percent have
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course BCOR 2300 taught by Professor Lopresti,a during the Spring '07 term at Colorado.

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New rule look out - New rule: Look out, not in. Old rule:...

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