CIVL 228 Module (1.3) - Design loads - CIVL 228 Introduction to structural engineering Module 1.3 Design loads Tony Yang Ph.D P.Eng Department of Civil

CIVL 228 Module (1.3) - Design loads - CIVL 228...

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DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, VANCOUVER Tony Yang, Ph.D., P.Eng. Department of Civil Engineering University of British Columbia, Vancouver CIVL 228: Introduction to structural engineering Module 1.3: Design loads
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CIVL 228 Introduction to Structural Engineering, Spring 2015 2 National Building Code of Canada Design requirements (Section 4): Buildings and their structural members and connections including formwork and falsework shall be designed to have sufficient structural capacity and structural integrity to resist safely and effectively all loads and effects of loads and influences that may reasonably be expected, having regard to the expected service life of buildings , and shall in any case satisfy the requirements of this Section (Section for structural design). What kind of loads should we design the structures for?
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CIVL 228 Introduction to Structural Engineering, Spring 2015 3 Design Loads Vertical (gravity) loads: Dead load (D) Live load (L) Snow load (S) and Rain load (R) Horizontal (lateral) loads: Wind load (W) Earthquake load (E) Hydrostatic pressure load (H) Other loads: Pre-stressing load (P) Temperature load (T) Fire load (F) Blast load (B) Impact load (I)
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CIVL 228 Introduction to Structural Engineering, Spring 2015 4 Vertical (Gravity) loads Dead load (D) Live load (L) Snow load (S) and Rain load (R)
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CIVL 228 Introduction to Structural Engineering, Spring 2015 5 Dead load (D) Definition: Load associated with the weight of the structure and its permanent components For example: Structure self-weight (including beams and columns) Flooring, ceiling, and partition Mechanical, electrical, and plumbing components Permanent storage Because member size is unknown at the start of the design process, member self-weight must be estimated at begin of the design. Once the structural member size has been determined, the dead load should be checked. This may lead to an iterative design process.
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CIVL 228 Introduction to Structural Engineering, Spring 2015 6 Dead load (D) What are the weight of typical structural materials? Steel: Concrete: Wood: What are the typical building component weights? Gypsum 1 plaster ceilings on wood lath: 0.5 kN/m 2 (= 10 lb/ft 2 ) Marble flooring: 1.5 kN/m 2 (= 30 lb/ft 2 ) Gypsum partition wall: 0.2 kN/m 2 (= 4 lb/ft 2 ) Brick wall: 0.5 kN/m 2 (= 10 lb/ft 2 ) per inch thickness Cladding: 0.75 kN/m 2 (= 15 lb/ft 2 ) Mechanical system: 1.4 kN/m 2 (= 28 lb/ft 2 ) Tapered insulated roofing: 0.5 kN/m 2 (= 10 lb/ft 2 ) *1 lb/ft 2 is about 0.05 kN/m 2 77 kN/m 3 (= 490 lb/ft 3 ) 23.6 kN/m 3 (= 150 lb/ft 3 ) 6 kN/m 3 (= 38 lb/ft 3 )
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CIVL 228 Introduction to Structural Engineering, Spring 2015 7 Live load (L) Definition: Load that can be moved on and off the structure For example: People Furniture Appliance or laboratory equipments Vehicle for parking garage Typical design live loads: Office building: 2.4 kN/m 2 (= 48 lb/ft 2 ) Residential unit: 1.9 kN/m 2 (= 38 lb/ft 2 ) Classroom: 2.4 kN/m 2 (= 48 lb/ft
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