religiouspalazzo

religiouspalazzo - Maia Kazaks May 10, 2005 ArtHi 6f Wed....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Maia Kazaks May 10, 2005 ArtHi 6f Wed. 5pm Borrowing Ideas and form The design of the Palazzo Medici, owned by the important family, of Renaissance Florence is not unlike several aspects borrowed from the Salisbury and Chartres Cathedrals. Both the secular and religious buildings had an interaction of public and private- the bishop and the family had defined chambers or rooms while simultaneously allowing the house (or house of God) to be welcoming to pedestrians on the ground floor. Also, the attempt to reach the buildings upward, in courtyards, domes, vaults and storeys, was used for both types of structures. The openness above the naves of the typical churches is paralleled by the courtyard in the center of the townhouse. The naves generally had lofty rafters or a high vaulted ceiling, and the Palazzo Medici was completely open to the sky. Instead of difficult technology required for an oculus or other lighting, the light comes directly, unfiltered. The Palazzo had similar columns to the church structures, which were topped
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

religiouspalazzo - Maia Kazaks May 10, 2005 ArtHi 6f Wed....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online