Remembering_the_Kanji_volume_3

Remembering_the_Kanji_volume_3 - CONTENTS PREFACE by Tanya...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CONTENTS P REFACE by Tanya Sienko 5 I NTRODUCTION 7 PART ONE : WRITING 1 New Primitives & Kanji Primitives 15 2 Major Primitive Elements 28 3 Miscellaneous Kanji 144 4 Western Measurements 160 5 Phonetic Characters 162 6 Old & Alternate Forms 165 PART TWO : READING 7 Old Pure Groups 177 8 New Pure Groups 203 9 Semi-Pure Groups 236 10 Mixed Groups 264 11 A Potpourri of Readings 299 12 Kanji with Japanese Readings Only 344 13 Readings of Old & Alternate Forms 355 14 Supplementary Kanji 359 INDEXES INDEX 1 Number of Strokes 371 INDEX 2 Keywords and Primitive Meanings 389 INDEX 3 Readings 418 INDEX 4 Primitive Elements 487 Layout of Frames for Part One 490 Layout of Frames for Part Two 491 A BOUT THE AUTHORS 493
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Preface Tanya Sienko W HEN I FIRST contacted Dr. Heisig with a proposal to add a third vol- ume to Remembering the Kanji , I somehow left the impression that it was my rather esoteric needs as a scientist that left me hankering for more kanji than the 2,042 I had learned with his method. Actually, it was not the technical prose of Yukawa and Tomonaga on ³eld theory that were causing me my biggest headaches but ordinary Japanese nov- els. Having read mystery novels to polish my reading in other languages, I was disappointed to ³nd that the “essential” or “general-use” charac- ters were simply not enough to gain entry into the Japanese thriller. After just a few chapters, my maiden voyage ended on the rocks. So much for “basic literacy,” I thought to myself. And so was born the idea for this book. During the time of the American Occupation, the Japanese writing system underwent a complete overhaul, which saw the number of Chinese characters to be learned during the years of compulsory educa- tion reduced to a bare minimum of 1,850. The idea was to simplify the system and facilitate literacy by removing rarely used kanji from circula- tion. What the reformers did not count on in their long-range plan was the resistance of the general public to the disappearance of many kanji customarily used for names. Families reacted by continuing to name their children with “traditional” names, but the government refused to register the kanji. This resulted in the bizarre situation where a number of Japanese were growing up legally nameless. In 1951 the Ministry of Education grudgingly backed down and approved another 92 “legal” characters for names, followed by another 28 in 1976. In 1981 the number of “general-use” kanji was increased in 1,945 and in 1990 the
Image of page 2
kanji approved for use in names was increased to 284. This is the situa- tion at present. Of course, there were still numerous kanji outside the list that contin- ued to be used in place names, or that appeared in books published before the educational reforms and were impractical to update. Over the past twenty years many of these exiled characters have migrated back into daily use. Advertisers often prefer the compactness and precision of older kanji to their phonetic equivalents. Increasing competition has induced universities to include more and more “unof³cial” kanji in their entrance examinations. And popular novelists, as always, cling tenacious-
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern