Lecture 4-5 Central Tedencies

Lecture 4-5 Central Tedencies - Operationalizing Central...

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Unformatted text preview: Operationalizing Central Tendency What constitutes an intelligible and informative measure of central tendency in a distribution? 1) The score or category at which the distribution peaks 2) The score or rank that divides a distribution in half 3) The score that balances the distribution; center of gravity 1 Mode Where the distribution peaks; the most typical measurement class Qualitative/ranked data - the category with the highest frequency count Discrete variables - the most frequently observed score Continuous variables - the midpoint of the most frequently observed measurement class 2 Mode: Pros and Cons Pros: Appropriate for qualitative data Easy to determine Captures the shape of the distribution (bimodal distributions) Not inFuenced by extreme scores 3 Mode: Pros and Cons Cons: Ignores most of the information in a data set Unstable for samples from populations with Fat distributions (kurtosis) May be undened for small data sets Problematic with continuous data Not mathematically tractable (i.e., a terminal statistic - not useful in higher level statistics) 4 Median The score that divides the distribution into two groups with equal frequencies 1) Order observations from least to greatest 2a) If n = is odd, count in ( n +1)/2 steps from either end. That is the median. 2b) If n = is even, Fnd the scores corresponding to positions ( n /2) and ( n / 2)+1 , add them together, and divide by 2....
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This note was uploaded on 01/21/2009 for the course PSYC 60 taught by Professor Ard during the Winter '08 term at UCSD.

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Lecture 4-5 Central Tedencies - Operationalizing Central...

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