MEM425_MidtermII_E-TeamF.2008_Modified

MEM425_MidtermII_E-TeamF.2008_Modified - DREXEL UNIVERSITY...

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              
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Introduction: The performance of an aircraft is essentially a statement of its capabilities and a different selection of these will normally be specified for the various categories such as transport, military and light aircraft, even though several common performance factors will feature in every such selection. For the engineer involved in the design criteria or at least desirable objective, where as late in the design sales staff will quote the performance features as the basis for the commercial strength of the emerging aircraft. For either reason, the performance will be stated in terms of quantities such as Direct Operating Cost, maximum range or various payloads and fuel loads, cruising speeds, take offs and landings as well as airport requirements. It is clear that the performance of an aircraft depends on its design and it follows that performance may often be improved by changes in design. This is a subject of great importance but the design of an aircraft involves integration of several different technologies, aerodynamics, structures, materials, power plant and systems; in its significant relation to performance, but way beyond the scope of this exam question.
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Airplanes are transportation devices which are designed move cargo and people from one place to another. Aircrafts can vary greatly depending on the mission it must serve. For the purpose of the questions of the exam, basic concepts of aircraft are revisited for information appeal to non-technical audience. For airplanes to fly, you must lift the weight of the aircraft, including the aircraft itself along with fuel, the passengers and the cargo. Various engines provide thrust to propel the aircraft through air. The air resists the motion in the form of aerodynamic drag. To control and maneuver the aircraft, smaller wings are located at the tail of the plane. The tail usually has a fixed horizontal piece, (called the horizontal stabilizer) and a fixed vertical piece, (called a vertical stabilizer). The stabilizer’s job is to provide stability for the aircraft, to keep it flying straight. The Vertical stabilizer keeps the nose of the plane from swinging side to side, while the horizontal stabilizer prevents an up-and-down motion of the nose.
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2009 for the course MEM 425 taught by Professor Yousuff during the Fall '08 term at Drexel.

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MEM425_MidtermII_E-TeamF.2008_Modified - DREXEL UNIVERSITY...

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