3208Ch8 - MCB3208CHAPTER8LECTURENOTES CENTRALNERVOUSSYSTEM

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MCB 3208 CHAPTER 8 LECTURE NOTES CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM Introduction: Development and general anatomy Development of the nervous system occurs as an epithelial surface involutes forming a tube. This tube then grows such that the inside becomes filled with fluid while the outside cells develop into nerve cells. The fluid-filled chambers are called the ventricles . The nerves growing on the outside are the neurons, in two hemispheres interconnected by the corpus callosum . In general, the nerves grow such that the outer region (cerebral cortex ) is gray because it contains mostly cell bodies while the inner regions of the hemispheres contain myelinated axons coursing from one place to another (white matter ). Hemispheres, also called the forebrain , are connected to the spinal cord to allow communication with the rest of the nervous system, and lower regions (below the hemispheres) are divided into: Hindbrain regulates basic aspects of body function (heart, kidney, lung and GI) Midbrain interconnects forebrain and hindbrain and serves as a relay region. Hemispheres have specializations associated with different regions: Frontal lobe, separated from the parietal lobe by the central sulcus , has motor nerves involved in control of voluntary (skeletal) muscles. Parietal lobe: sensory nerves involved with touch and other sensations in specific parts of the body. Association areas: Neurons surrounding sensory areas that help interpret incoming sensory information. Areas surrounding motor nerves are involved in the control of the motor nerves. Occipital lobe
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3208Ch8 - MCB3208CHAPTER8LECTURENOTES CENTRALNERVOUSSYSTEM

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