lect_13nucleus2slides-08W

lect_13nucleus2slides-08W - Attaching such a sequence to...

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1 The Nucleus Evolution of the Nucleus
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2 Phase Contrast Micrograph (Living cell) Electron Micrograph of a HeLa Cell
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3 Nuclear Subcompartments Chromosome Organization Packing Ratio Length( µ m) 1 6 7.5 4 10 10 34,000 5,700 760 190 19 1.9
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4 DNA replication takes place in factories Nuclear membrane continuous with ER
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5 The Nucleus has Outer and Inner Membranes Outer Nuclear Membrane Continuous with ER
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6 Functions of the Nucleus
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7 Note that the nuclear membrane lipid composition is pretty similar to both ER and Golgi. There is a lot of PI, more than the plasma membrane (Reason?) Freeze fracture of the nuclear membrane
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8 Nuclear Pores are Big complex structures Nuclear pore complex is large, 10 8 D, has eight-fold symmetry and spans
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9 NPC Diffusion through NPC
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10 Nuclear Transport Nuclear localization sequences are necessary and sufficient.
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Unformatted text preview: Attaching such a sequence to non-nuclear proteins transports them inside. 11 1. Proteins move both ways through nuclear pores. 2. So do Ribosomes 3. And Viruses Ran GTP/GDP determines direction of transport 12 Cycling of Molecules and Importing and Exporting through Nuclear Pores Ran GTP/GDP Roles of Ran GAP and Ran GEF 13 Lamins and the nuclear membrane Note the perpendicular arrangement of the lamin network Nuclear pore 14 Location of lamins on the inside membrane where DNA can attach. 15 During mitosis in animal cells the breakdown in the nuclear membrane is obligatory to chromosome alignment and separation by spindles. It is a check point. The nuclear membrane breaks down and forms vesicles with lamin attached. 16...
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lect_13nucleus2slides-08W - Attaching such a sequence to...

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