Session 9 Waiting Line Models I

Session 9 Waiting Line Models I - OSCM356 Operations...

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1 OSCM356 Operations Management Session 9 Waiting Line Models I (Queuing Analysis I) Fuqiang Zhang Olin Business School Washington University in St. Louis Spring 2008 Session Outline Introduction to queuing analysis Three major components of a queuing system Arrivals Waiting characteristics Service Performance measures of queuing systems Examples M/M/1 OSCM356, Spring 08, Prof. Zhang Session 9 Slide 2
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2 Where the Time Goes OSCM356, Spring 08, Prof. Zhang Session 9 Slide 3 It is estimated that Americans spend 37 billion hours a year waiting in lines. In a life time, the average American will spend-- SIX MONTHS Waiting at stoplights EIGHT MONTHS Opening junk mails ONE YEAR Looking for misplaced objects TWO YEARS Unsuccessfully returning phone calls FOUR YEARS Doing housework FIVE YEARS Waiting in line SIX YEARS Eating Introduction We wait in lines at grocery stores, banks, airports, hotels, restaurants, theaters, theme parks, post offices, and traffic lights… Most of it represents a loss of limited resource (time) which can never be recovered. Add the frustration and irritation we may experience. Waiting lines do not always contain people. Think about work in progress in a plant, returned videos to be returned to the shelf at a rental store, and emails on the Internet waiting to be sent out by a server… Therefore, businesses should be interested in reducing or eliminating the amount of waiting to improve customer service and system efficiency. OSCM356, Spring 08, Prof. Zhang Session 9 Slide 4 Queuing theory/analysis represents the body of knowledge dealing with waiting lines.
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3 Introduction Bankers Trust Company reduced personnel by over one teller per branch, saving over $1 million annually. Wyle Data Services improved service and reduced cost by applying queuing formulas on alternative data processing network configurations. An Oklahoma bank used the results of a queuing evaluation in deciding how to expand a drive-in window system. Beckton Dickinson Company used queuing theory to optimize manpower - machine assignments, saving $500,000 per year. OSCM356, Spring 08, Prof. Zhang Session 9 Slide 5 Why Do Queues Exist?
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course OSCM 356 taught by Professor Zhang during the Spring '08 term at Washington University in St. Louis.

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Session 9 Waiting Line Models I - OSCM356 Operations...

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