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ars154 2 009 - ‘ Chapter 6 DRAWING THE CUBE PREREQUISITE...

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Unformatted text preview: ‘ ' Chapter 6: DRAWING THE CUBE _ PREREQUISITE TO UNDERSTANDING PERSPECTIVE Drawing the simple cube (or any rectangular prism such as a brick, a book or the U.N. Secretariat) from many viewpoints is an important exercise which reveals and explores basic perspective principles. The iollowing pages dramatize many of these. But these studies can only point to the problems involved and help to stimulate your powers of observation. To draw properly you must supplement them with intensive sketching and observation of your own. Get into this habit. - \\\\\ ax The six sides of a cube (or any rec- Q tangular prism) are “edged" by three _ sets of parallel-lines. When the cube rests on a horizontal suriace, such as a table top, one set of lines is vertical (113., perpendicular to the ground), the other two sets are horizontal (73.9., level with the ground) and at right angles to each other. MY C Owen: PICTURE - ON THE FOLLOWING PAGES: —VERTICALS WILL BE INDI- i CATED BY PIPES —ONE SET or HORIZONTALS '. WILL BE INDICATED BY ; CHAINS ~THE OTHER SET OF HORI- ZONTALS WILL BE INDI- CATED BY “TIRES NOW A QUICK REVIEW: We see things, as shown on pages 18 and 19, b by a cone of vision. The central visua} ray iomises upon the center of interest, T011811]? circular area withhi which we can see things clearly. Perpendeular to plane, Which may be thought of as a piece of glass or the drawing pap be considered perpendicular to the central visual ray, hence always parall in mind. ' gs Also recalZ the following points: Lines and planes parallel to the cheer-vet’s face (and consequently to the picture plane) undergo no distortion, but maintain their true directions and shapes. ! Lines and planes which are not parallel to the observer’s face (picture plane) appear to converge and foreshorten. [Such lines are sometimes described as “receding.”) r _ The vanishing point for any set of receding parallel lines is the point at which the observer’s sight line parallel to : the set intersects the picture plane. To locate this point, the observer merely "point5” in the same direction as the 15-1185- _ :‘ THE DIAGRAMS ON THE NEXT SEVERAL PAGES ARE BASED ON THESE FUNDAMENTAL l K PRINCIPLES. _ ' (In the following examples you can either think of the observer as walking around the cube, or of the cube as . Evolving. The results are identical.) y means of a cache! visual ray surrounded while the cone of vision defines the the central visual ray is the picture er or canvas itself. The observer’s face will also e1 to the picture plane. Keep this schema ...
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