HIS315L Notes - ID TERMS Identification(2x15 pts You will...

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ID TERMS Identification (2x15 pts.)You will be given a list of five words/terms, culled from reading and lectures. You will be required to choose two. Full credit will be given for an ID that (in perhaps 4-6 sentences) clearly states “what” or “whom” the term is, explains the historical context surrounding the term, and explains why the term is significant enough for us 21stcentury folks to be studying it hundreds of years after the fact. In rough terms, the definition of the term is worth 4points, the context of the term is worth 4 points, and the significanceof the term is worth 7 points.Here’s a sample ID for which I would give full credit:War Hawks—This was a term used to refer to younger Republican leaders from frontier areas who pushed for a U.S. declaration of war against Britain prior to the War of 1812. Led most notably by Speaker of the House Henry Clay, of Kentucky, and South Carolina’s John Calhoun, the War Hawks railed against Britain for impressing American sailors and for instigating Indian attacks along the western frontier, and urged President James Monroe to go to war to protect America’s honor. Less publicly, Calhoun, Clay, and other Hawks also hoped that a war would result in the easy conquest of Canada. The War Hawks are significant because they reveal the growing policymaking power of states outside of the old Virginia and New England dynasties, and of a younger generation of post - Jefferson Republicans. (4 sentences; 130 words)Probable ID’s: -Plessy vs. Ferguson: 1896-Berlin Airlift-Marshall Plan-NATO-The Atlantic Charter-Quarantine SpeechWar Powers Act of 1941Definition: Gave President Roosevelt unprecedented control over all aspects of the war effortContext: The task of fighting on a global scale dramatically increased the power of the federal government. Shifting from civilian to military production, raising an army, and assembling the necessary workforce required a massive expansion in government
authority.Significance: Marked the beginning of some call the imperial presidency: far-reaching use (sometimes abuse) of authority during the latter part of the the twentieth centurEmergency Banking Act of 1933Definition: Permitted banks to reopen if a Treasury Department inspection showed that they had sufficient cash reserves.Context: nearly nine million families, and panicked account holders raced to withdraw their funds. On March 5, 1933, the day after his inauguration, FDR declared a national “bank holiday” — closing all the banks — and called Congress into special session.Significance: This act was the beginning of theHundred Days and a new era in US history and the relationship between government andpeople.FBI Definition: an anti-radicalism division in the Justice Department and appointed set up by attorney general Mitchell Palmer, with J. Edgar Hoover to direct it; shortly afterward, it became the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).Context: In April 1919, postal workers discovered and defused thirty-four mail bombsaddressed to government officials. In June, a

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