ihotel2

ihotel2 - CHAPTER EIGHT “No Evictions. We Won't...

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Unformatted text preview: CHAPTER EIGHT “No Evictions. We Won't Move!" The Struggle to Save the l-Hotel “This land is me valuable (0 permit poor people to park rm it. “ —Jllstir1 Harman, [firmer executive dirt-.ntm' 0| Iln- San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, mm Some of the manong tenants of the International Hotel. Photan < 1..“ u---- 9‘3 The land Herman was referring to in the quote above was a city block in the heart of downtown San Francisco's growing Financial District. One of the most famous skylines iii the worltl was being reshaped. The "Wall Street of the West" had been expanding for years and the 800 block of Kearny Street was prime real estate. It was also the block where the International Hotel stood. And it became the block where the rights of people of color who were low-income and elderly tenants were fought over for nearly a decade. The movement to save the "I-Hotel," as it was called, is one of the most important chapters in the history of Asian American struggle and of housing conflicts. It was a protracted campaign that eventually drew hundreds of people into the ranks of activism, It was, as the San Finnetsco Chronicle put it, “a cause celebre for the politically engaged?2 in the late 1970s, the [Hotel was just about all that was left of Manilatown, once a thriving community of mostly male Filipino immigrants that covered 1'0 blocks between San Francisco's China- town and Financial'districts. During the 1920s and 1930s, the 1- Hotel (built the year after the devastating 1906 earthquake) became home to thousands of seasonal Asian laborers. Many young Filipino and Chinese men who worked as day laborers, dishwashers, mes- sengers and at any other profession that was deemed "appropriate for Orientals" lived there. So did old-timers, who settled in San Fran- cisco following years ofworking in seasonal harvests, on merchant ships, in canneries in Alaska and Washington, and so on, up and down the Pacific Coast. Many of the old-timers, though not citizens, had served in both World Wars, but the U.S. government denied some of them promised benefits after the fighting stopped. Asian women were, for the most part, excluded from entering the U.S. until 1965, thereby preventing most of the men who lived in Chinatown and Manilatown from establishing families. Further, California's antimiscegenation laws prevented Filipinos and other Asians from marrying outside the race. Nevertheless, "race preser- vation" was the concern of white elite California in the 1930s; testi- many before the House Committee on Immigration and Naturaliza- tion warned that "the Filipinos are...a social menace as they will not leave our white girls alone and frequently intern'iarry."J 9,; Roots of lustlce VJ . . . . my DESI-different kind of family life persisted, as the bachelor sori i ipino men preserved their cultu ‘ ‘ ‘ '— reinthe 0 ll] Sh A p o 1a is, barhi ckpps and other Manilatown meeting places. As one of the Fili Till: r K I I I {l ne'estwho lived in the l-Hote] remarked in 1987 "lth l‘lt‘rf‘ 1 lint I l , r . . .r ' K g orhood, and good and very kind country men old and new frie d .. ruins. .. I have stayed here so long that I call this hotel my home ”' was a good place for brown people—Filipinos—specific M comin ’ ' g for Jobs in Alaska or on the farms—a unique place where You met friends to guide you and maybe recommend you to ' b » 331d Napeek.‘ rJU Sp ally Fellow resident Peter Yamainoto echoed the sentiment Livmg in the l-Hotel and Manilatown—Chinatown you re need of Filipinos and Chine ' se to live with‘ ' where they could f‘i m the” C alize the rid the day t d | nmmunit‘v' I ‘ I - o— ay tiings that the could find living "'1, say, the Thnderloin—a cheap hotel y mi their friends. [It] was a beautiful place their ftde with camaraderie." Urban Renewal = Filipino Removal Afte ' r World War II, San Fransisco made plans to expand its do wntou n tl”. EIIL-d IL [I L 11'] I]! all)!“ I] clll.‘ District. Redevelopment was the buzzwmd of the time a d ' and more corporate headquarters moved into the area As tnh '- mom rises went up during the building boom of the late lgfills l dL many small businesses and residential hotels were torn dadlvii] “WEI; pfiteyECZpIeafing "urban renewal" project had ' mating hundrEdg :hthe Fillmore District, west of (low the City's largest.Btleark0:1ES and displacing thousands of residents in redevelopment that 136 oniinunity.‘ But it was the Financial [District the Opening of the BB cime top priority for the city‘s expansion, as made it eaéier F rea Rapid Transit system in the mid-1970s or white-collar workers to commute from the 0le l in are ‘ pin: a; into downtown to work in the major banks trading ('Ulll- s an ‘other corporate entities moving into the L I The effect. of course, was to change the 1 high- 9605, already torn ntowii, deci- EII'CE]. . _ andsca c f ] . . munit , , l3 0 tie enm— y Manilatowii was devastated. Tan full blocks of low cost housin massesgt,hrei:;aurants. barber shops, markets, clubs and other busi- at enefited a Filipino community that numbered around No Evictions. We Won't Move! 95 I . \ . - 1 “1,000 people wr.rr. dcstroyct ‘ D I ’ I'w By the end of the expansion, thousands ot people had been dis placed. More than 4,000 low-income units were torn do‘wnlin lav]: of high-rise buildings [including the famous T'ransaniericak- yialn ts and the Bank of America's world headquarters) and par mg 0 . Four out of every five low—cost residential hotels in the area were ' fthe 19705. I ganglfi t::tll:‘l:dh00tcl5 slated for demolition was the internatioan Hotel, where tenants could rent rooms For only 50 dollars a mlont 1é Lottie late. 19603, meat of the hotel's. tenants were poor, and a mos. all were elderly—in the community they were referred tit: manongs, an Ilocano term ofrespcct For the “old-timers.- One 0d m , nianongs, Felix Ayson, remarked in 1986, “:N‘lost of my ttmwelan we: years in America tspend in this hotel, so it is my home. iene d no work in the country, I come here and find a Job injtbe eity, an 1 live here." Ayson had lived in the l-l-Iotel since 1928. I r I ‘ More than three million elderly people in America SOCIEE: depended on low—cost residential hotels In the 1950s and fillings“!£11 by the close of the 19605, the hotels had become synonymoc HM urban decay and blight as politicians and investors sought to pi y Hullll:llkllallclliml-EJGS, Milton Meyer and Company, headed by Sat; Francisco business magnate Walter Shorensteinnbought the 1l—Ho-ttc and made plans to construct a multilevel parking lot on t-iecfit: Shorenstoin secured a demolition pc rmit in Septorriber, and In c til her he ordered the evictions of the 196 tenants, giving then; on t the first of the year to be out. "We deeply regret‘havmg to t tsrtupn the lives of these good people," Shorenstem said as the ewe i0 ' r t.” “OUTESth‘EdtiLZing pace of' downtown redevelopment, the sale pf the I-t-lotcl and the eviction notices to its tenants ‘we‘re befits-.11: noticed, except by a few, including Joaquin Legaspi,ld1rectoifo th? Manilatown Information Center, a multtservice provider or m. community. San Francisco State College protessor Jovma wives-1th; who had been active in the Filipino community, also leatn‘ct1 pd.“ evictions and put out the first word on the college t2;lll"lllllt~i,l'[.-a‘-l to a series of highly publicized protests, led by newly po iticize 96 Roots of justice Asian American students at San I“: ethnic studies programs and were also in the war in Vietnam. Many students involved in the cainpu oration Front sought to new ethnic studies and consciousness movements; the idea, a Itnx‘r‘l one on college campuses, was to go back into the community and ‘anr:isco State and lit: lterki-Ir-t At the time, students at both campuses were beginning to press In: the midst of protests owl s-based Third World Lib practice the principles espoused in their work f'orjustice. The early l-liotel demonstrations became a politi cal introduction fer-large numbers search of their cultural roots. "It was a generation o who was active in the defense ofthe our own voice, The [Hot ethnic studies was all abo justice where there isn’t "Fight to Save the 1-1 activists and organizers. The sudden interest between Milton Meyer and Company ciation tUI’A), led by Ness Aquino, was draw the land into a parking lot were shelved. could be signed, a tire hr ants and giving Shorcnst Returning Resource The community continued to increasineg loud demonstrations, including some who had refused to leave. Eventually, the UM secured agreement, promising to standards within a year. Asian American Studies Floyd lluen, who hcade -Iotel" became a battl of Asian Ar'i'ie'rican students in is lot ot'activism,“ recalled 'Itarry Mantis-Ia. manongs. "We were looking Int cl struggle was a good application ol'whal ut-go study yourconnnunity and look lltl any, There was just so much going on :n the time. You couldn’t help but be political.“ {2 {11'}! (lllltlllg ‘thllllt': in the hotel and publicity l'rom the mm- mtlnily soon led to :I change in direction; a least: agteitnn-m and the United l-‘ilipino Asso- n n p and plans to male- lint helore Ihv fight-attract“ oke out in the building, killing lllrta' ten oin justification to cancel the agreement and go ahead with demolition. s to the Community resist demolition h_v staging and most of the elderly tenants, been at the hotel for more than 30 years. a three—your leasi- bring the building up to housing [iltll' Volunteers, mostly from in: Hello-.Ii-\"-'- program, worked to relm'hlsli the hotel. d the UC program, later recalled using No Evictions. We Won't Move! 9? student fees in the project and justifying it as "returning resources to the community."“' Over the next several years, the fight over who controlled the hotel was tied up in the courts. The UFA dissolved and in its place the international Hotel Tonants Association (lHTA) was organized, led by Emil de Guzman. Bill Sorro, in his 20s at the time of the demonstrations but not a student, was the only young person living in the l—Hotel at the time. Between 1970 and 1974, he called the three-story building his home: I wasjust another te_n_ant,_I paid my $45 a month in rent, I mean, I had responsibilities there —I painted, cleaned bathrooms, really whatever needed to be done. I wanted to get involved in the Fil- ipino community, so I knew the issues, but I really saw myself as another tenant...l related to the old-timers. I was part of them. They were like the relatives in my family, They were like my uncles, you know. People just focus on the big events and the evictions, but you have to understand that there were nine years of hard work that we put into that hotel. It was day—to-day, outside of the media spotlight, by a whole spectrum of people, across race and class lines. We really made good connections with the old-timers and were there for more than just demonstrations. We did all the, related work that isn't very glamorous. We helped them under— stand their rights to Social Security and Medicare. 1 mean, these were immigrants and many of them just didn't know. Also, as part of our work as budding revolutionaries, we tried to figure out how to change the environment of the Com— munity of people in the hotel to see tl'1e1nselvos as being part of more than just their locked—in building. We provided social activ— ities, we got a bus From UC Berkeley and took them out for day trips to the beach to have a barbecue and that kind of thing. I think we really succeeded in developing a trust between the young people and the tenants. Now they may not have agreed with all of our revolutionary rhetoric, but they were like your grandparents. They understood your heart and showed a lot of patience with you. It was a special thing.“ The International Hotel had become a symbol of more than just a housing struggle. For the many people who became intimately involved with the residents and their community, the hotel became 98 Roots of Justice a matter ofthe heart. The folks who worked to bring the hotel back from the brink of destruction were also able to use the media to communicate that, after all, these were elders who were being threatened. Hotel organizers were able to sway public opinion and as a result, make the city's political leaders feel the heat. It appeared as though the hotel was going to survive its most direct challenge. Tired of the bad press and the extensive community support of the hotel at any mention ofdemolition, Shore nstein secretly sold it in 1973 to a Thai businessman named Supasit Mahaguna—and his Four seas Investment Corporation forjust over $850,000. Four Seas applied For a demolition permit but was immediately met with more protests and litigation. Finally, in 1976, Superior Court Judge Ira Brown, a former San Francisco landlord himself, ruled in favor of Four Seas and ordered the evictions. San Francisco Mayor George Moscone attempted to broker a deal that would have the city blur the hotel and sell it back to the tenants, but at $1 .3 million, the prirl: was impossible. Eventually, the eviction order stuck and the San Francisco Sheril'l‘s Office and Police Department were ordered to re~post eviction notices, No Evictions! We Won’t Move! Word spread among people who had initially defended the hotel and who had promised support ifanothcr attempt was ever math: to kick the tenants out. For Asian American activists and organizers who had been politicized in the heat of the. first battle and won: presently working in the community, word that eviction notions won- goiug up was a beacon call. 011 January 7, 1977, more than 35!] supporters from the ll l'l'r‘t. Asian Community Center, Kearny Street Workshop and other [Illin- munity groups and organizations in solidarity with the tenants Formed a human barricade to prevent the police from posting the notices. Chanting "No eviction! We won't move!" the dennmstrators Forced the city and the police into retreat. The next week, after notices were finally posted, some 5,000 people linker! arms around the entire block to prevent the forced eviction oftcnants. The show of resistance and “threat of violence" forced Judge Brown to grant an immediate stay of eviction. Brown cited unconfirmed reports No Evictions. We Won’t Move! 99 that tenant supporters had been stockpiling automatic weapons e. andigiiastvc‘llal; however, a court ruling strengthened Four Seas“ claim of ownership and eviction notices again appeared. Again they were met by massive demonstrations, including a night whenflanother human fence grew eight people deep in front of the hotel. We have been terrorized by insecurity and fear,“ tenant Felix Ayson shouted to supporters during the eighth eviction attempt in the now mne- year-long struggle. "We are here to fight for our right to stay! Again, the-tenants won a stayof eviction.12 _ On August 2, l-Hotel tenants Wahat Tampao, Nita Radar, Benny Gallo, Ayson and others conducted a sit-in at City Hall to pressure the mayor and Board of Supervisors to support the struggle. Th; next day, however, the conservative California Supreme ICourt little the stay and reordercd the evictions. This time slierifPs deputies and city police came with a show of force stronger than before. Again they were met with resistance. I TBrry Bautista remembers the duties of the young organizers leading up to the evictions: We all took on any assignments that were needed. Some were needed to work the phones. Some were lookouts on the roof. I remember 20 or more people sleeping on a stage inside the build- ing, while large numbers of other people were helping the ten- ants. Some would stay with them in their rooms to make sure that nothing happened to them. My job was to be a lookout [for police| at the Front door. It was basically sentry duty. The cops could come at any time and we had to be ready. It was like we were getting ready for war.” The plan of action for the inevitable day when the police would come with full force was to form the largest human barricade possr— his, seven to eight rows deep around the block with even more peo- ple layered inside the building, up every step, outside every room. Even the Reverend Jim Jones (yes, that Jim Jones) of the heople 5 Temple had mobilized more than 300 this followers and arrived on the scene in seven busloads. “Just imagine, it was wall~to-wall peo- ple around the whole block," Bautista says. "It was a constant mass of protest. It really was incredible." 1 GD Roots oi lustice The police had cordoned offs two—squarc-mile perimete what probably would have been thousands more w come to the hotel in support ofthe tenants. r to stop ho intentch lo Tbnarit Nick Napeek remembers getting home around 4 pin. on the night of August 3. He had heard that the police wrm: that night. Around 10 pm, he started telling the other, older tenants on his side of the building to go inside their rooms and lock up. The riot police could be seen blocks away practicing maneuvers in full riot gear; a battalion of mounted police had their horses ready for. action. Finally at 3. am- on August 4, the-cry- l-‘ro-m sot-nu- where in the crowd came: "They're coining!" Some 400 police coming in full riot gear rushed the 3,000—person-strong barricade to evict the fill or so tenants barricaded inside the hotel. The resulting scene, captured on film in (lurtis (lliov‘s moving documentary The (“all oldie l-Hotel, was of demonstrators, iv been linked arm—in-arm, being forcibly moved out of the way, of police moving in and breaking down doors and of their brutality some tenants who didn't move quickly enough for them. 'ltznant ‘Tbny Goolsby told East-West. “They threw us Lip against a wall in the. middle Ofthe buflding‘“ one mid me. “You don’t move. l‘ll break your fucking nacho-m ho land In San Francisco Sheriff Richard I-longisto, who had earlier spent five days in jail for contempt of court when he refused to carry onl an eviction order, apparently had a change ofheart by the time he was leading the line of cops into the hotel. In a dramatic moment, with cameras flashing all around him, Hongisto used a sledge h illll‘ rear to break down doors to tenants' rooms. The pictures of old immigrant tenants being forced out into the street were shown on newscasts across the country and in manv places outside of the U.S. The entire spectacle, according to most observers, including those who had never supported the tenants' stand, was disgraceful, Tbnant Florentine Ragadeo. who had lived in the same room im- more than 20 years after serving in the US. Army and surviving the. Bataan Death March in World War II, reserved blame for the real culprits. "1 do not blame policeman, not blame sheriff, " he told {Just- Wesr days after the evictions. "The judge! The mayor! t know that No Evictions. We Won't Movel IO] they are the ones who have the right to stop the eviction. Especially the owner ofthe hotel. Before you evict, you should find a place for the tenants...l'm crying all the time...lt’s not right."“ "It was like the Roman Legions coming alter the Christians," recalled de Guzman. "It was incredible humiliation. We had these elderly men who had to drag themselves to the street, and they were suddenly homeless. A lot of the manongs didn‘t really live much longer. It's like their hearts were broken.” ‘5 Preserving Heritage and History On the 10th anniversary of the eviction, de Guzman explained the importance of fighting back against the powerful interests who wanted the hotel gone from sight. "For me and many of us who were born and raised in San Francisco, who have a lot of memories of what Manilatown was like as a community where our own fathers, relatives and friends hung out, the real issue was not the eviction but the attempt to destroy our heritage. The hotel was part of that historical foundation which we wanted to preserve.” For more than a decade, the struggle to preserve the l-Hotel and all that it represented often occupied center stage in San Francisco politics. The issues oflow-incolne housing, the rights of the elderly and people of color and the fight against I“urban renewal" ("people rights over property rights," was a slogan from the demonstrations) were all ingredients in a struggle that eventually captured interna- tional attention. Though the battle against eviction was lost and the hotel destroyed two years later—its fine bricks, ironically, used in the construction of million-dollar homes in other parts of the Bay Area—the struggle lives on in spirit. Many of the young Asian Americans, who became activists during that effort, found an important issue they could truly identify with. Politicized by the movement, many have stayed to work in the communities they rediscovered in 1958. A real pan-Asian American political identity was formed and from the subsequent work of these and other activists came a plethora of community services designed to meet the needs of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, Cambodian, Viet- namese and other Asian immigrant populations. 102 Roots of lustlce “These were old people," said B I . autista who, twnnt -‘ ‘- is still active, serving on the y ym'h' tilt-.I. national t‘ttlll‘lt'll ol'l" ’ ‘ " ‘ ‘ . . Iliplno( Ivil It 'I ' Advocates " ' 1 IL "5 . You had to have a certain level of sympathy for Ilu-m We knew that we had to be fighting back.” I 1 “530” “I. Bill Sorro continues to work as a committh or days for Iowrincome tenants i-n-San Francisco's Mlsslo: can look back at the I—Hotel," he said, "and say that 2llyt'1rs l'll -‘ the Same principles apply. Back then we called it self—(letter: (' [:h hon. deay it's community empowerment. ’ 1 mm‘ call 't ' ' ' ' h 1 , it s the same idea. People have rights, tenants have rights We ave to recognize those rights and fight back I I animr, tlntsn District. "We Whatever you want to “Today, 20 years since the 50 elderly tenants we their homes to make room For a parking 2 I and Jackson streets remains empty. ironic; made into a parking structure, as develo never decide on a suitable project. Called "the Hole" now by locals it is a ' ' ' ' te Istigige sight in an area where giant skyscrapers (l0l'llln'llt‘ thr- rrain. : ‘ ' L I 1 “me t many, though, the lot 13 notyust wasted land, hut a mou- n to protest and to organized community struggle. re forced out of stage, the lot at Kearnv lly enough, it was never pers anti the city could Postscript: filler years c f negotiation and conunui ' ,_ . no; plans have been formalized lo (lesig l Hotel, with construction scheduled Low-income elder support, it and build a nenI lniernaiirmnl to he completed by the enrl of Will) 3 are to move into the new 14- “'1” include space for a performing this era fiir young people in the connmmily. The l Manilatoit'n Cultural Center and Museum, where i‘onnnunii ‘ ' ' ‘ ‘ and history—including some from the old l-Hotel ' y (Em-mm Each floor is to be named after rior wall will li story structure, which ntcr and a school oitlu: arts urnI liolel will also house llu.’ —lt‘lll he on display. a prominent ,ionner it: I nun.I and an inn:- st t is names ofoll those who u ere evicted. No Evictions. We Won’t Move! 1n? .2 35: gm .9 H2: .5. Es: mum m: _.E::E Er; .52?8:: 5235,; ./.._._..:. .. dz: .2 5:: Ham. ; “5&2 ...;....:E._o 9.22.3 :5. .E .2 4.5.2 3.4.25.5: . .3: .5 at: .m 2&3. .3: 5m .3 9:: .9» .EE 3:. $5 a .m .39. sum .2 Hag ma isms/x gmuiézm .m. Ewe .m “msmnin .4 RE: .N. :39? .«ui. 5.1 .2 A H 62: ,w isms< :35.wa c :5: f coins Er: BEtufi; 5:8. :3. .: 2:: .n :3, :5. .m z}. .Eurazg xvii .53 a: .EE .332...“ H . .H _ _ C. 23:5 ._ mthZ .936 Sin: «En ~35}. LEEU bEzEEoU :22. E: 5 $72.26 .23 EE £295 :23: 355: :mm E: .3 “.3385 FE moo. EEO: BCOZDEEE 522$ d3: 8 Eva m. :_ g 2.52.. 9.82.33 .Wzm .3653. .3 4928 “753...: 23 m “a .3 my 4.3m m . . . Fifi . z Emu. . n . o .2 2225...: at. mo”. EB... I The Power of the People United Stops Februaryfi. 1:00 pm. Portsmouth Square 1 International Hotel Eviction ( Kearny 8.. Washington St., in S.F. Chinatown) WE DEMAND: WITHDRAW THE EVICTION ORDER! BUY THE INTERNATIONAL HOTEL FOR LOW-INCOME HOUSING AND COMMUNITY CENTERS! % FIGHT FOR OUR HOMES AND COMMUNITY CENTERS! Iponlorod by: Work." Como-rmqu Flght For tho II'IIII'I'IIIIDflII Hotel and Victory Work": Committee to Fight For the International Hotel and, Victory Buiidln ;. and Hay First Worker! Organization. :70 Allan Communityr Cantor. Building, and Hay First workers Organization 846 Kunur St... San Francisco CA 94MB phone: 39750619 The Power of the People United 0n Honday, January 17 at 5:00 p.e.. only 12 hours before the police and sheritfs had planned to carry out the eviction with earl- eue force, Jtflge Ira Brown was forced to issue a temporary postpone- eent of the eviction order. Once again, a huge victory for the International Hotel - a vic- tory that thousands of people have fought long and hard for. The capitalists were dead serious about carrying out the evic- tion. For weeks they trained 100 sheriffs and policemen to carry out the eviction in full riot gear. By Honday'sfternoon. news re- ports told people not to park their cars on Kesrny Street so that the police could close off the area. Sheriff Hongisto announced that the eviction would begin before dawn. But at the last minute, they backed down. Police Chief Gain said the reason was that the situation was too dangerous, that ten- ants were seen on the roof arsed with euro-uric weapons and gasoline bombs. These so-called "hard facts“ of Chief Gain are outright fabri- cated lies.‘ The tenants have weapons alright - the organized support of the people. There's 11.500 signatures on the International Hotel petition, and resolutions true 35 unions and col-unity organitations. Hundreds of letters and phone calls flooded City Hall demanding that the eviction be stopped. 0n Hednesday. January 12. 2500 people dem- onstrated in front at the Hotel. and 3 days later the numbers grew to 5000. Literally hundreds of thdussnds of people have heard of the International Hotel and support it because it represents the interests of all working people. The international Hotel fight says N03 to the way eillions at us are forced to live. This is the eighty force that beat thee back. And like cornered rats. the capitalists are scared and desperately trying to attack the fight with half-baked stories of guns and bombs. th are they so desperate? Because in this fight we have stood up to their systea of asking profits off our backs. He said NO: to a handful or rich people throwing us out into the streets so that they Stops International Hotel Eviction could build something more profitable than low-tent housing. We said NO! to the court decisions and the laws that said the owner has all the rights. With thousands of people in Chinatown living 5 to a room and paying outrageous rentsl we say, "To hell with their profits and courts that serve and protect the rich. He must have decent housing." This fight is sparking off a wave of resistance in Chinatown. Tenants of the Victory Building are fighting eviction by Four Seas Investment Corporation - the same landlord as the International Hotel. Tenants on Sacramento street are fighting rents that were hiked.er $55 to $35 a month for rooms with no heat and no hot water. Tenants at the Ping Yuen Housing Projects are organizing to force the Housing Authority to repair the run-down buildings. Building from the strength of this victory, we can back them down all the way. The struggle isn't over. This is only a tempo- rary postponement of the eviction. He are demanding that the Hotel be bought and kept as low-rent housing and community centers. The Mayor has cone up with a plan to buy the Hotel which is still in the courts. But this plan is designed to put the burden back on the tenants by making them pay back the $1.5 million it will cost to buy the building. If we HAD $1.5 million we wouldn't be living here to begin with. The fight against eviction at the International Hotel has gone on for over 8 years and we won't cove now. He are going to win our fight by building it bigger than ever, by fighting the workers' way - organized and disciplined, standing strong instead of kneeling down to the courts and the rich. By rallying even more strength and support' we are sure to win final victory! Please send letters of support and union resolutions to: Mayor Hoscone - City Hall, San Francisco, CA 94102 S.F. Housing Authority - 440 Turk St., S.F. CA 94102 send duplicates of these letters to the Workers Committee. cfo Asian Community Center, 846 Kearny St., 5.F. CA 94103 5 115' ........nu._n pun. nucconou ti 5 _ .. :munua 013n— umufi .o .55.. EB... .58 .532". 823% "are..." 2: 2.32 332.8. 4.3.: 0.— ..muuun 033.“ 035 ho is: «an... . 9.3. Steven... n a_ nume- .tfi:._ an»? n 5:. 0% 3 quu E; .53 «£58. .2 2:: he .5: .8. En. _ 5:8 Stucco... 35 co on o. nonco— nusE 2.2. :3 r. "ucmE hE E an? 8E 5.. a .3 -. EE .2: .3 :3? 35.2303 32.. 3.9:. “53 : Ea... Eon. .3... .3 .3 LonEqu. rant _ . .23. 2 «2.33 E cactus... v33 6.. .2325 “up: 53% aha—goon a cum -3 9.. ma nun... “E no goo. 3.53 39.... Au .E.au a on... u: .032 3 noufiupn o: as wuuuuo; ufi 9.3.353 anti; L.3... «E..— m._30a 2: E 3.2“ 2. 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ihotel2 - CHAPTER EIGHT “No Evictions. We Won't...

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