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Unformatted text preview: 1 Marion Fourcade Department of Sociology UC Berkeley [email protected] Office hours: Thursdays 11:30-­‐1:30pm in Barrows Hall 474. Please sign up online at . Soc 101. Classical Sociological Theory Fall 2014 T-­‐Th 9:30-­‐11, Lewis Hall 100 This course offers an introduction to the construction of social theories through a survey and critical analysis of the foundational texts in sociology. We will explore the following questions: (1) What are the main themes and arguments developed in classical sociological theory? (2) How do they relate to the social and intellectual context in which these texts were produced? (3) How do these theories help us understand the world around us? Remember… -­‐Don’t be intimidated by these texts. Try to “get into them.” The purpose of the course is to help you understand the logic of social theories from within. By the end of it you will look at the world in a different way, through many different pairs of theoretical lenses. -­‐Read what is assigned in the syllabus: the amount of reading is limited and carefully chosen, so you can truly focus on the essentials. -­‐Think analogically. Don’t dismiss these texts because they were written a 100+ years ago. A lot of what is being said here applies just as well to the society you live in. -­‐Keep an open mind. You’ll learn a lot from these texts, and from our collective discussions about them. The questions these authors ask are essential; the processes they identify are very general; and the texts are profoundly stimulating. That’s why we read them and why we consider them to be at the foundation of our discipline. They will help you gain new insights into your life and that of others, develop a more critical view of the world around you, and perhaps navigate your future in a different way. REQUIREMENTS Requirements Value Date due Memo #1 10% September 25 Mid-­‐term exam (in class) 15% October 21 Memo #2 10% November 25 Section grade 25% See with GSI Random in-­‐class quizzes 15% throughout Final exam 25% December 16, 3-­‐6pm 2 Should you fail to show up for an exam or turn in a paper for any other reason, I will record a 0% for that assignment. If you have any questions about submitting work, ask me or your section leader well before it is due. Note that no extensions will be granted on the memos. Memos (prompts to be given later) Memo #1-­‐On Commodity Fetishism. 1,200 words. Memo #2-­‐On Rites. 1,200 words. Mid-­‐term and final exams Both exams will be a mix of essay-­‐type and short answer questions about the class material. These are closed-­‐book tests, which means you cannot use notes or electronics (this policy includes cell phones and MP3 players). Quizzes There will be an undisclosed number of in-­‐class quizzes (up to 5 questions each) during the semester. You are required to purchase an i>clicker remote from the Cal Student store or online at , and register it (see below). The i>clicker will be mandatory at every lecture after the first two weeks of classes. We will use it for spontaneous polling, quizzes and participation. Note: The components of the so-­‐called ‘quiz grade’ are as follows: 1 point for participating in the quiz, 1/3 point for each correct answer (maximum # of questions on one quiz is 6). Each quiz thus carries a maximum of 3 points. There will be at least 7 quizzes in the semester. I will discard the two worst quizzes at the end of the semester, possibly more if we do more than 7 quizzes. Highest quiz grade is 15 points. Attendance Attendance to both sections and lectures is mandatory. Important: I will take attendance at every class during the first two weeks of classes, and randomly afterwards. If you miss a class during the first two weeks without notifying me, you will be automatically dropped from the course on September 11. Sections Important: Anybody who is interested in taking this class must enroll into a section. There are seven GSIs for this course. Each of you must be registered both for the lecture course and for one of the 14 sections listed below. 3 GSI name and email address Jason Ferguson [email protected] Jason Ferguson [email protected] Aya Fabros SECTION NUMBER MEETS IN 101 MW 8-­‐9 225 WHEELER 102 MW 9-­‐10 225 DWINELLE 103 MW 10-­‐11 134 DWINELLE 104 MW 11-­‐12 186 BARROWS 105 MW 12-­‐1 115 KROEBER 106 MW 1-­‐2 47 EVANS Alex Roehrkasse 107 MW 2-­‐3 186 BARROWS [email protected] Alex Roehrkasse [email protected] 108 MW 3-­‐4 179 DWINELLE Alex Barnard 109 TTh 12-­‐1 115 KROEBER 110 TTh 1-­‐2 115 KROEBER 111 TTh 2-­‐3 115 KROEBER 112 TTh 4-­‐5 189 DWINELLE 113 TTh 6-­‐7 115 KROEBER 114 TTh 5-­‐6 115 KROEBER [email protected] Aya Fabros [email protected] Fatinha Santos [email protected] Fatinha Santos [email protected] [email protected] Alex Barnard [email protected] Matt Stimpson [email protected] Matt Stimpson [email protected] Shannon Ikebe [email protected] Shannon Ikebe [email protected] COURSE MATERIAL Five books are on order at the Cal Student Bookstore: • Robert C. Tucker, ed. 1978. The Marx-­‐Engels Reader, W. W. Norton. ISBN 039309040X. • Max Weber, 2002, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Penguin. ISBN 0140439218. • Durkheim, Emile. 1995. Elementary Forms of Religious Life. The Free Press. ISBN-­‐ 10: 0029079373 • Durkheim, Emile. 2014. The Division of Labor in Society. The Free Press. ISBN-­‐ 10: 1476749736 • Marcel Mauss. 2000. The Gift. The Form and Reason for Exchange in Archaic Societies. W. W. Norton & Company. ISBN-­‐10: 039332043X Should you decide to buy the book, I have also requested a smaller number of copies of Norbert Elias, 2000. The Civilizing Process. Blackwell. ISBN 9780631221616, though I do provide scans for our selections from this text. 4 iclicker Also at the bookstore, you must purchase an iclicker remote and register it imperatively at -­‐your-­‐remote/register-­‐clicker/. You must bring your iclicker remote to every class. Please note that all types of iclickers (iclicker 2, iclicker +, iclicker GO) will work. You may be able to buy a used remote from the bookstore, and / or to sell your remote back to them at the end of the semester. Reader and online resources Finally, a reader can be made available from Copy Central, 2560 Bancroft Way if enough people in the class express a desire to buy it (poll at the first lecture). Note that all the required and many recommended readings have also been uploaded on bSpace (under ‘Resources’) / bCourse. Course reserve The documentaries will be available from the Media Resource Center. Helpful textbooks If you want to go further, I recommend the following textbooks: Raymond Aron. Main Currents in Sociological Thought. Transaction Publishers. Randall Collins. Four Sociological Traditions. Oxford University Press. Lewis Coser. Masters of Sociological Thought. Waveland Press. Anthony Giddens. Capitalism and Modern Social Theory. Cambridge University Press. Warren Schmaus. Rethinking Durkheim and His Tradition. Cambridge University Press bSpace/bCourse All course resources (e.g. pdfs of all required texts) are available on bSpace. I am in the process of transitioning this class to bCourse, so everything should be replicated there as well. Academic honesty You must in no way misrepresent your work or be party to another student’s failure to maintain academic integrity. It is your responsibility to check the code of academic integrity at . The standard penalty for violations of academic integrity in this course will be an F grade for the course. Written assignments must include complete bibliographies and follow proper citation practices (including page numbers for direct quotes from scholarly texts). Grievances If you wish to contest a grade, you must come first to your section leader and submit him/her a one-­‐page statement explaining why you think the grading is unfair. Only if you are still dissatisfied should you come to me. Before I will listen to your case, however, I will first want to hear from your GSI. I will not change any grade without first discussing it with him/her. Please bear in mind that your grade may move upwards or downwards should I decide to re-­‐grade your paper. 5 Grading scheme You will accumulate points throughout the semester. The total # of points for all assignments is 100. Your course grade will be calculated as follows: A+ A A-­‐ B+ B B-­‐ >96% 93-­‐96 90-­‐92 87-­‐89 83-­‐86 80-­‐82 C+ C C-­‐ D F 77-­‐79 73-­‐76 70-­‐72 60-­‐69 <60 6 Lecture 1. August 28. Introduction. Course Organization. What is social theory? Recommended: Randall Collins. ‘Prologue: The Rise of the Social Sciences.’ Pp3-­‐46 in Four Sociological Traditions. University of Chicago Press 1994. ADAM SMITH (1723-­‐1790) AND THE PROGRESS OF THE DIVISION OF LABOR Lecture 2. September 2. Smith on the Division of Labor Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations, Bantam Classic 2003. Pp9-­‐26; 91-­‐99; 572 (paragraph on the “invisible hand”); 987 “In the progress…”-­‐994. (Reader) Recommended: Robert Heilbroner, ‘The Wonderful World of Adam Smith.’ Pp42-­‐74 in The Worldly Philosophers. Simon and Schuster. Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations, Pp. 99-­‐197. KARL MARX (1818-­‐1883) AND FRIEDRICH ENGELS (1820-­‐1895) AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF CLASS STRUGGLE Lecture 3. September 4. Introduction to Marx & Engels: Biography & Method. From Tucker, The Marx-­‐Engels Reader: Marx, ‘Inaugural Address of the Working Men’s International Association’, Pp512-­‐9 Marx, ‘Speech at the anniversary of the People’s Paper’, Pp577-­‐8 Engels, ‘Working Class Manchester’, Pp579-­‐85 Engels, ‘Speech at the Graveside of Karl Marx’, Pp681-­‐2. Recommended: Robert Heilbroner, ‘The Inexorable System of Karl Marx.’ Pp136-­‐170 in The Worldly Philosophers. Simon and Schuster. (Reader) Lecture 4. September 9. Historical Materialism and the Theory of Alienation: From Tucker, The Marx-­‐Engels Reader: Marx, Preface to A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, Pp3-­‐6. Marx, ‘Estranged Labour’ (from Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844), Pp70-­‐ 81. Marx, Theses on Feuerbach Pp. 143-­‐145. Excerpt from Charlie Chaplin, Modern Times, 2:50-­‐10:15. Recommended E.P. Thompson, “Time, Work–Discipline and Industrial Capitalism.” Past and Present 1967. Lecture 5. September 11. Classes and Class Struggle. From Tucker, The Marx-­‐Engels Reader: Marx, German Ideology, p. 176-­‐179 Marx and Engels, Manifesto of the Communist Party, pp. 473-­‐483, 499-­‐500 Marx, Class Struggles in France, pp. 586-­‐589 Marx, 18th Brumaire of Louis Napoleon Bonaparte, p.608 (from ‘the small peasants…’ to ‘…society to itself’) 7 Lecture 6. September 16. Ideology and Revolution. From Tucker, The Marx-­‐Engels Reader: Re-­‐Read Marx, Preface to A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, Pp3-­‐6; add p54. Marx, German Ideology, Pp163-­‐175 (esp. 172-­‐175); 186-­‐188; 192-­‐193 (from ‘Finally’… to ‘society anew’). Lecture 7. September 18. The Dynamics of Capitalism. From Tucker, The Marx-­‐Engels Reader: Marx, Wage Labor and Capital, pp. 203-­‐217 Marx, Capital, Vol. I., Pp. 319-­‐329 (fetishism of commodities); 419-­‐428 (general law of capitalist accumulation) Marx, Capital, Vol. III., 439-­‐441 Recommended: Marx, Capital, Vol. I., Pp. 329-­‐336 Duncan Foley. 1986. Understanding Capital: Marx’s Economic Theory. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Lecture 8. September 23. Documentary. Mac McClelland. “A Visit to the Warehouse of Soul-­‐Crushing Sadness.” Mother Jones. July 12, 2011. Micha Peled, China Blue See -­‐blue.html OR Michael Moore, Roger and Me This documentary portrays the impact of delocalization on the city of Flint, Michigan, as General Motors closes plants and eliminates thousand of jobs across the region. Recommended: Charles Ferguson, The Inside Job. Lecture 9. September 25. Discussion and conclusion on Marx -­‐ Transition to Max Weber. Weber, ‘Classes, Status Groups and Parties.’ Pp43-­‐56 in Runciman, ed. Weber. Selections in Translation. (Reader). Weber, ‘Domination and Legitimacy’ and ‘Three Pure Types of Authority.’ Pp212-­‐216 in Economy and Society. (Reader). Recommended: Thomas Piketty. 2014. Introduction, chapter 7. In Capital in the 21st Century. Harvard University Press. Stuart Jeffries. 2012. “Why Marxism is on the Rise Again.” The Guardian, July 4. Memo #1 due at the beginning of September 25 lecture. No late memos accepted. MAX WEBER (1864-­‐1920) AND RATIONALIZATION 8 Lecture 10. September 30. Introduction to Weber. Biography. Main concepts. Weber, ‘The Nature of Social Action.’ Pp7-­‐32 in Runciman, ed. Weber. Selections in Translation. (Reader). Weber, ‘Science as a Vocation’, 129-­‐159 in Gerth and Mills, From Max Weber (Reader). Recommended: Elizabeth Kolbert. ‘Why Work. A Hundred Years of “The Protestant Ethic”.’ The New Yorker. Nov 29, 2004. Lecture 11. October 2. The Institutional Conditions for Capitalism. Weber, Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Pp.1-­‐36 (particularly 8-­‐28, ‘The Spirit of Capitalism’), Pp359-­‐365 (until ‘…equally important.’) in Appendix II. Lecture 12. October 7. Religion and Economic Development. Weber, Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, pp. 67-­‐87; 105-­‐122. Recommended: Weber, ‘The Social Psychology of the World Religions,” Pp. 293-­‐301 in Gerth and Mills, From Max Weber. Weber, ‘The Religions of Asia’, Pp192-­‐205 in Runciman, ed. Weber. Selections in Translation. Peter Baehr, 2001. The "Iron Cage" and the "Shell as Hard as Steel": Parsons, Weber, and the Stahlhartes Gehäuse Metaphor in the Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, History and Theory, 40(2): 153-­‐169. Lecture 13. October 9. Power. Finish Protestant Ethic. Weber, ‘Bureaucracy’ Pp196-­‐240 in Gerth and Mills, eds. From Max Weber. (Reader). Recommended: Kieran Healy, “A Sociology of Steve Jobs” (on charismatic authority) Lecture 14. October 14. Movie. Heinz Schirk, The Wannsee Conference (Reconstructed Documentary). 85 minutes. Please be on time. The subject of the movie is the Wannsee conference in 1942, during which top SS officials presented their program to exterminate the entire Jewish population of Europe to the various bureaucracies of the Third Reich (the Nazi regime in Germany), and secured their support and cooperation. You can see information about the conference, including the full minutes, at: -­‐wannsee.htm Lecture 15. October 16. Discussion of movie, conclusion on Weber, Midterm review. Lecture 16. October 21. Midterm exam (in class) EMILE DURKHEIM (1858-­‐1917) AND SOCIAL DIFFERENTIATION 9 Lecture 17. October 23. Emile Durkheim. Biography. Method. Durkheim, Rules of Sociological Method, Pp.34-­‐47 (What is a Social Fact?), 241-­‐242 (Social Morphology). (Reader) Recommended: Preface to the second edition of the Rules of Sociological Method Lecture 18. October 28. Durkheim. The Movement of History. Social Differentiation. Durkheim, Division of Labor, Book I. Pp. 33-­‐38 (Introduction), 45-­‐104 (I-­‐2, II, III). Table V.1 p122-­‐123. Recommended Lewis Coser, “Introduction to the 1984 edition,” pp xi-­‐xxiii Lecture 19. October 30. Anomie Durkheim, Division of Labor, Book II. Pp. 201-­‐206 (II-­‐2), 258-­‐274 (V), Durkheim, Division of Labor, Book III. Pp. 277-­‐303 (I-­‐II), 309-­‐319 (Conclusion) Recommended Steven Lukes, “Introduction to this edition,” xxv-­‐xlvi. Lecture 20. November 4. Social Classification. Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. Pp1-­‐18 (Introduction); 33-­‐44 (Book I, Chapter I, III-­‐IV) Recommended Anne Rawls. 1996. “Durkheim's Epistemology: The Neglected Argument.” American Journal of Sociology, 102(2): 430-­‐482 Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. Translator’s introduction Lecture 21. November 6. The Nature of Religion. Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. Pp207-­‐234 (until ‘…moral life’: Book II Chapter VII), 303-­‐314 (Book III Chapter I until ‘…into practice’), 350-­‐352 (From ‘It is necessary..’ to ‘… and friction’), 418-­‐448 (Conclusion). Recommended Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. Pp99-­‐126 (Book II Chapter I) November 11. Veterans’ Day. No class Lecture 22. November 13. Discussion and Conclusion on Durkheim Excerpt from Stanley Kubrick, Full Metal Jacket Patricia Marx, 2012. ‘The Hunter Games; For four wild days, University of Chicago students turn scavengers.’ The New Yorker, July 2. DURKHEIMIANS -­‐ MARCEL MAUSS (1872-­‐1950) Lecture 23. November 18. 10 Mauss, The Gift, Pp. 1-­‐14 (until ‘…the generations.’), 39-­‐46 (From ‘The three obligations…’), 65-­‐83. Marcel Mauss, ‘Techniques of the Body.’ Pp. 77-­‐83 in Marcel Mauss: Techniques, Technology and Civilization. Schlanger (ed). New York: Berghahn Books, 2006. (Reader) Recommended Theodore Caplow, ‘Rule Enforcement Without Visible Means: Christmas Gift Giving in Middletown’ American Journal of Sociology 1984 SIGMUND FREUD (1856-­‐1939) AND THE ORIGIN OF CIVILIZATION Lecture 24. November 20. On Human Civilization. Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents. Pp735-­‐772 In Peter Gay (ed.), The Freud Reader. (Reader) NORBERT ELIAS (1897-­‐1990) AND THE INTERNALIZATION OF SOCIAL CONSTRAINT Lecture 25. November 25. The History of Manners Elias, The Civilizing Process. Vol I. The History of Manners. Pp72-­‐92, 99-­‐135. (Reader) Memo #2 due at the beginning of November 25 lecture. No late memos accepted. November 27. Thanksgiving Day. No Class Lecture 26. December 2. The Movement of History Elias, The Civilizing Process. Vol II. State Formation and Civilization. Pp365-­‐379 (The Social Constraint Toward Self-­‐Constraint.) (Reader) Lecture 27. December 4. Conclusion of the course and review. Final exam: Tuesday, Dec 16, 3-­‐6pm ...
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