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The Catcher in the RyebyJ. D. SalingerJ. D. Salinger Biography:J. D. Salinger is famous primarily for two things: his novelThe Catcher in the Rye(1951) and his reclusivelife.Catcheris a semiautobiographical account of its teenage protagonist, Holden Caulfield. The novel’s first-person narration gave voice to a generation of frustrated young men who longed to escape the strictures of“proper” society. Although the work was an immediate popular success, Salinger has never penned anotherpublished novel. He did have success with several short stories, including “A Perfect Day for Bananafish,” firstpublished inThe New Yorkerin 1948. Success also followed with his collectionFranny and Zooeyin 1961.Despite his enormous acclaim, though, Salinger has rarely published after 1959 and has only granted anoccasional interview, preferring a life of anonymity.FACTS AND TRIVIA:Salinger’s father wanted him to follow in his footsteps as a meat importer, sending his son to Austria tolearn the trade. Salinger left Austria just one month before the country fell to Hitler.He served in the army during World War II, saw action in D-Day, was among the first American soldiersto enter a liberated concentration camp, and interrogated prisoners of war as a counter-intelligence officer.The Catcher in the Ryewas one of the most banned books and paradoxically one of the most taughtbooks of the twentieth century.The character Holden Caulfield first appeared in the short story “Slight Rebellion Off Madison.”Salinger has been at various times a Zen Buddhist, a Christian Scientist, and a Scientologist.BiographyArticle abstract:Although Salinger wrote only one novel and thirty-five stories, he attained a degree ofinternational recognition and popularity that is unequaled by most twentieth century American authors.Early LifeBorn in Manhattan, the setting (or focal point) for most of his best fiction, Jerome David Salinger was thesecond child and only son of Sol and Marie Jillich Salinger. His paternal grandfather, Simon, born in Lithuania,was at one time the rabbi for the Adath Jeshurun congregation in Louisville, Kentucky. His mother, reared aChristian, converted to Judaism upon marrying Sol and changed her name to Miriam. Salinger’s father, animporter of meat (hams from Poland in particular), was a highly successful businessman. The family lived onRiverside Drive during Salinger’s early years. The Salingers were not conventionally religious; the childrenwere exposed primarily to the ideas of Ethical Culture. In 1930, young Salinger, or “Sonny” as he was called byhis family, spent the summer at Camp Wigwam in Harrison, Maine (the probable source for the setting of hislast published story).
Salinger attended Manhattan public schools until, at age thirteen, he was enrolled in the McBurney School, alsoin Manhattan, where he earned below-average grades but became manager of the fencing team and was electedsophomore class president in his second year there. In the fall of 1934, hoping for better academic performance

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