1st Lecture

1st Lecture - Maximillian Tong U54-55-2388 RN 103 A1 Prof....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Maximillian Tong U54-55-2388 RN 103 A1 Prof. Cogan Lecture on Fundamental Concepts in Buddhist Thought The lecture was composed of two parts: the understanding of wisdom in Indian and Buddhist literature, and the development of these ideas over time. According to Wright, learning about wisdom is easier when done through another school of thought – his original idea of wisdom came from his Western education, and he was able to challenge and develop his ideas by comparing them to the Eastern definition of wisdom. Wisdom is the heart of Buddhist practice. It gives birth to enlightenment and compassion for the world. The world is full of “emptiness” – all things are inherently empty, lacking an immortal and Self; we must learn to work with the emptiness of the world to achieve wisdom. Wisdom uses three characteristics define emptiness: impermanence, dependence on others, and lack of an immortal essence – by this definition, humans and religions are empty, because they change over time. Even enlightenment can be empty –
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course RN 103 taught by Professor Cogan during the Spring '07 term at BU.

Page1 / 2

1st Lecture - Maximillian Tong U54-55-2388 RN 103 A1 Prof....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online