Rational, Natural, and Open Systems of Organizations.docx -...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 9 pages.

1Rational, Natural, and Open Systems of Organizations(Baum & Haveman, 2020)The modern concept of an organization started in the 17thand18thcenturies, primarily in the United States and Europe (Scott & Davis, 2007). Organizations, attheir core, represent commonality in that it is a group of individuals with shared values workingtoward a common goal(Scott & Davis, 2007). Over the last half-century, organizational scholarshave adopted three major definitions for the concept of an organization. The three definitions areopen, rational and closed systems (Scott & Davis, 2007). These definitions represent thescholarly development of organizations; however, many modern organizations are a blend ofeach. As a society, culture, and viewpoints change over the generations, the particular values andperceived needs of organizational design have changed with them (Winiecki, 2010). In the mid-19thcentury, for example, organizations became large and distributed, while in the present,organizations have evolved into a concept of an ecological system (Winiecki, 2010). The public,if asked, would develop a mental picture of an organization as the classic pyramid-shapedorganizational diagram. Managers within firms often see their own organizations in the sameway. To them, structure means their defined work teams, activities, and reporting relationships.In large organizations, this view of organizational structure generates a bureaucratic feel (Onday,2018). A deeper understanding of organizations is much more complicated and requires leadersto understand relationships to guide the organization effectively.The idea of the rational system began in the early 19th century when organizations wereviewed to be metaphorical machines that could be designed to achieve predefined and large-scalepurposes (Winiecki, 2010). Each component of the organization was considered a part of the“machine” designed and manipulated to meet a very specific goal with high levels offormalization (Scott & Davis, 2007). The high level of formalization reduces the diversity of
2action and gives participants explicit rules and relationships to guide their behavior (Onday,2018). There are few, if any, organizations in the present day that are purely rational system-based. Individuals in modern times are too nuanced and personalities often too strong to keepeach person in a predefined, highly structured role. The core of rational theory in a businesssetting are company-wide goals and a specific decision-making process; however, other factorssuch as ethics, morale, and motivation are not considered. Goals allow for fact-based criteria todrive the methodology to find a solution or action (Scott & Davis, 2007). To assist in makingrational decisions, individuals may use organizational charts, facts, data, or diagrams and will useterms such as efficiency, optimization, or design.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 9 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Summer
Professor
TBA
Tags
The Bible, Scott Davis

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture