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THeoTHRS231-NEWNEW2DQNN.doc - effect of this work are...

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effect of this work are wonderful; examined through a tube, on a level with the eye, theillusion is complete to one familiar with the Falls.” Henry T. Tuckerman, Book of theArtists: American Artist Life (New York: G.P. Putnam and Son, 1867), 386. The “tube”that Tuckerman refers to enabled visitors to focus more easily on specific details in thepainting. Akin to rolling up a piece of paper and peering through, this was a lesssophisticated, lens-less version of opera glasses, which will be discussed at greaterlength in the next chapter. 26. Gregory M. Pfitzer, Popular History and the LiteraryMarketplace, 1840–1920 (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2008), 3, 4.Whereas the average print run had been 2,000 books early in the century, by mid-century 30,000 to 100,000 copies were routinely published. Ibid., 4. 27. Benson Lossing,“Art,” as cited in Independent Examiner, February 24, 1855, GA-28, Box 3, LossingPapers, Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library, Premont, Ohio, quoted in Gregory M.
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Cornell University, Rutherford B Hayes, Benson J Lossing

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