Why does Marx consider most workers "alienated"...

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Exam Questions Answers Why does Marx consider most workers "alienated" from their acts of production? Explain why you do, or don't, think that his analysis applies to the work one does as a student. Does it make a difference if (1) your major is something you are intrinsically interested in, or (2) it is something that you are studying only because you expect the degree to help you get a job at the end? “the worker is at home when he is not working, and when he is working he is not at home. His work is forced labor. It is therefore not the satisfaction of a need but only a means for satisfying needs external to it” someone else tells you how to work and what to work. They own the produciton Work is an instrumental good. In other words, it is the means to an end, not for its own sake. The salary of work has benefits to it but itself is a burden. This is the alienation. The example given in lecture is if one won the lottery, they would quit their job and avoid their work. Marx believes that workers do not se work good for its own sake. The worker is doing forced labor , with no satisfaction, and has no creative work put into it. In this regard, the worker’s human life is reduced to its animalistic life, where he eats, drinks, and procreates. Marx’s analysis on the worker being alienated from their act of production may extend to the work of a student. This though depends on whether the student finds their major intrinsically interesting or they find it more as an instrumental good. Students who pursue a major where they find it intrinsically interesting, will pursue that degree for its own sake – ie. for the education itself. For instance, a student may pursue a degree that may not be the most financially profitable one, such as Humanities, but they may be intrinsically driven to learn about Humanities. Conversely, a student may enter the prestigious Schulich MBA program, only as a means to make a great deal of money, but not for its own sake. This student may want to gain all that money in order to have enough so they do not need to work at all, or to have the means of buying expensive goods or experiencing expensive adventures. Although, the student who picks a major for the sake of having the means to gain their pleasures in life, they are to be alienated in their acts of production. They do not maximize their species’ creative ability, and simply perform the work as their means of a way out. In that sense, they live in an animal life on the daily, forced to go into work, uninterested. Although one may think that the labor would give you the means to pursue your creativity (such as the arts or gardening or traveling and studying different cultures), the issue is more with the daily routing of foced labor. One may still be alienated in the activity of their production (in the act of labor) even if they have the means to fulfill the creative selves. Study doesn’t connect with student, force labour is not natural act of creativity

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