Lecture 2

Lecture 2 - Today's Astro 3 class: Cookies are available...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Today Today s s Astro Astro 3 class: 3 class: z Cookies are available for the starving: Í Oatmeal raisin walnut Í Chocolate chip Í (one at a time, please) z Cell phones off now, please z We’ll continue with chapter E “Introduction to Astronomy,” then launch into chapter 1 “The Copernican Revolution” z My office hours today are 2:30-4 in Knudsen 4-107E Í We go through this material very quickly… get help?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
E.2 Earth’s Orbital Motion Daily cycle, noon to noon, is diurnal motion –so lar ±day Stars aren’t in quite the same place 24 hours later, though, due to Earth’s rotation around Sun; when they are, one
Background image of page 2
E.2 Earth’s Orbital Motion 12 constellations Sun moves through during the year are called the zodiac; path is ecliptic
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
E.2 Earth’s Orbital Motion Ecliptic is plane of Earth’s path around Sun; at 23.5° to celestial equator Northernmost point (above celestial equator) is summer solstice ; southernmost is winter solstice ; points where path cross celestial equator are vernal and autumnal equinoxes Combination of day length and sunlight angle gives seasons Time from one vernal equinox to next is tropical year
Background image of page 4
E.2 Earth’s Orbital Motion Precession : rotation of Earth’s axis itself; makes one complete circle in about 26,000 years
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
E.2 Earth’s Orbital Motion Time for Earth to orbit once around Sun, relative to fixed stars, is sidereal year Tropical year follows seasons; sidereal year follows constellations – in 13,000 years July and August will still be summer, but Orion will be a summer constellation
Background image of page 6
E.3 Motion of the Moon Moon takes about 29.5 days to go through whole cycle
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course ASTR 3 taught by Professor Hauser during the Fall '07 term at UCLA.

Page1 / 31

Lecture 2 - Today's Astro 3 class: Cookies are available...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online