{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lecture 2 - Today's Astro 3 class Cookies are available for...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Today Today s s Astro Astro 3 class: 3 class: z Cookies are available for the starving: Í Oatmeal raisin walnut Í Chocolate chip Í (one at a time, please) z Cell phones off now, please z We’ll continue with chapter E “Introduction to Astronomy,” then launch into chapter 1 “The Copernican Revolution” z My office hours today are 2:30-4 in Knudsen 4-107E Í We go through this material very quickly… get help?
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
E.2 Earth’s Orbital Motion Daily cycle, noon to noon, is diurnal motion – solar day Stars aren’t in quite the same place 24 hours later, though, due to Earth’s rotation around Sun; when they are, one sidereal day has passed
Image of page 2
E.2 Earth’s Orbital Motion 12 constellations Sun moves through during the year are called the zodiac; path is ecliptic
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
E.2 Earth’s Orbital Motion Ecliptic is plane of Earth’s path around Sun; at 23.5° to celestial equator Northernmost point (above celestial equator) is summer solstice ; southernmost is winter solstice ; points where path cross celestial equator are vernal and autumnal equinoxes Combination of day length and sunlight angle gives seasons Time from one vernal equinox to next is tropical year
Image of page 4
E.2 Earth’s Orbital Motion Precession : rotation of Earth’s axis itself; makes one complete circle in about 26,000 years
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
E.2 Earth’s Orbital Motion Time for Earth to orbit once around Sun, relative to fixed stars, is sidereal year Tropical year follows seasons; sidereal year follows constellations – in 13,000 years July and August will still be summer, but Orion will be a summer constellation
Image of page 6
E.3 Motion of the Moon Moon takes about 29.5 days to go through whole cycle of phases – synodic
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern