Medea - Rodenbeek 1 Cait Rodenbeek Professor Sutliff ENG...

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Rodenbeek 1 Cait Rodenbeek Professor Sutliff ENG 211 September, 2007 The Strength of Medea Some might consider this theory of independence through dependence somewhat presumptuous. How is the audience supposed to consider Medea’s actions of using magic, killing family members, and escaping her home as a symbol of freeness? After all, she commits these undertakings mainly to be closer to Jason and her children. She does not exemplify a strong woman by running away from her crimes into the arms of a man who moves on at the sight of something more appealing. It is not difficult to be persuaded into seeing Medea as a vulnerable, reliant woman instead of looking beyond what is on the surface. However, one should try to imagine the amount of self-reliance and inner-anguish she really endured. Perhaps it is something like leaving for college or taking the opportunity to study abroad. It is not as important of why she has left her home, but knowing no matter how much strength, she may not be free. Medea’s strength is subconsciously touched on throughout the entire play, but the first
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course ENG 211 taught by Professor Sutliff during the Fall '08 term at Kansas.

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Medea - Rodenbeek 1 Cait Rodenbeek Professor Sutliff ENG...

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