Pharm Chapter_44 - Chapter 44 Drugs Treating Fungal Infections Copyright 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams Wilkins Question Yeasts are

Pharm Chapter_44 - Chapter 44 Drugs Treating Fungal...

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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Chapter 44 Drugs Treating Fungal Infections Chapter 44 Drugs Treating Fungal Infections
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Question Question Yeasts are multicelled organisms. A. True B. False
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Answer Answer B. False Rationale: Yeasts are single-celled organisms about the size of red blood cells.
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Physiology of Fungal Growth Physiology of Fungal Growth Fungi can be separated into two groups—yeasts and molds. Yeasts are single-celled organisms. Molds produce long, hollow, branching filaments called hyphae. Fungi can produce disease in humans only if they can grow at the temperature of the infected body site. Normally, the body has yeast colonies on the skin, mucous membranes, and GI tract. Intact immune mechanisms and competition for nutrients, provided by the body’s normal bacterial flora, ordinarily keep colonizing fungi in check.
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Fungi Fungi
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Pathophysiology of Selected Opportunistic Fungal Infections Pathophysiology of Selected Opportunistic Fungal Infections Aspergillosis is a fungus commonly found in soil, water, and decaying vegetation. Infection is airborne. Candidiasis is a yeast-like fungus that is almost always present as part of the normal population of organisms in the mouth, skin, intestinal tract, and vagina. Cryptococcosis, which usually manifests as cryptococcal meningitis, is the most serious of the fungal infections in immunocompromised patients. Mucormycosis is a fungal infection of the sinuses, brain, or lungs caused by fungi such as Mucor or Rhizopus.
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Question Question Mucormycosis infections are easily treated with antifungal medication. A. True B. False
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Answer Answer B. False Rationale: Without treatment, mucormycosis has a mortality rate of 30% to 70%. Unlike other fungal diseases, mucormycosis requires surgical débridement of necrotic tissues in addition to pharmacotherapy to resolve the infection.
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Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Pathophysiology of Selected Nonopportunistic Fungal Infections Pathophysiology of Selected Nonopportunistic Fungal Infections Blastomycosis is a chronic infection characterized by granulomatous and suppurative lesions. Coccidioidomycosis is primarily a disease of the lungs, which is common in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico.
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