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CC class notes - Hume, An Enquiry Concerning the Principles...

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Hume,  An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals 02:44 sections I-V; section IX (II); Appendices I-III To think about:     What constitutes a just society, how do we know it, etc. try to figure out precisely the argument about moral sense of humans,  how society is just vs. unjust, relationship of gov’t to law many argue that Hume argument comes closest to how we live today notes:     Hume is fighting with a lot of people Starts by examining where our idea of morality comes from Morality must evoke sentiment Arguments of justice come from what it means to live in a society of scarcity appearing generous isn’t the same as being generous we naturally approve or disapprove of different acts Justice law only exists when you have property justice is required reason vs. sentiment
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gov’t gov’t institutionalizes law gov’ts can be founded on bad principles, but they are still functional gov’t based on superstition instead of justice what are functional gov’ts? o functional in sense that they are preserving the political body sometimes preservation of a tradition is important for the good of society Appendix II: argues that this moral sense we’re supposed to have is really just self-love Hume vs. Hobbes: Hume argues that morality is imposed by us and our own sentiment, not by an  external God o very secular, one of the first such thinkers  
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Kant,  Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals 02:44 politely argues w/Hume Hume argued that we are authors of our own mortality, but it is a conclusion we  come to based on ourselves and our feelings for other people but we don’t have any proof that this exists.  It’s just how we feel this argument falls into two camps: radical skepticism o we only know what we can know o violates what Plato said Hume insisted that we alone are the authors of our own moral code heteronomy o heteronomous moral systems based on deity, society, or the state Hume’s conception of the self is that we are all the same and therefore we  will.  Although there are some cultural differences, he trusts in basic human  benevolence. Hume has both skepticism about truth and the idea that morality comes from  the laws that we make Kant argues that we know morality through reason the beginning: starts with a common-sense conception about what it means to  be good o
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course COCI C1102 taught by Professor Howell during the Spring '08 term at Columbia.

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CC class notes - Hume, An Enquiry Concerning the Principles...

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