Vision - Eye Anatomy 1 The eye works like a camera! 2 Lens...

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Unformatted text preview: Eye Anatomy 1 The eye works like a camera! 2 Lens Diaphragm Lens Pupil The Eye Non-retinal parts keep a focused, clear image of outside world anchored on the two retinas 6 muscles (3 pairs working in opposition) per eye If eyes not precisely aimed at same point, we see double Cornea and lens together form the equivalent of a camera lens Adjustment of focus is done by changing the shape of the rubbery, jelly-like lens Performed by the ciliary muscles At age beyond 45, lens becomes hard and we lose our ability to focus Diameter of the pupil controlled by two sets of muscles Works like the iris diaphragm (f-stops) of a camera Self-cleaning of cornea by blinking lids and lubricating with tear glands 3 Retina Translates light into nerve signals Connects to the brain via the optic nerve 22 mm wide, 0.25 mm thick At the back of the retina, photoreceptors Rods : vision in dim light (not functional in bright light) Cones : color, high resolution vision in bright light Fovea (inside the macula ): small area with high density of cones (no rods) 0.5 mm in diameter Only 1% of the retina, but takes up 50% of the visual cortex in the brain Outside fovea, cones are present but with lower density 4 Light Color Vision The light spectrum is electromagnetic energy spread over different wavelengths The wavelength of the light indicates the light color 3 types of cones (R,G,B) Sensitive to different wavelenghts Each cone type sends a message to the brain depending on the wavelength of the light it receives Rods are sensitive over a wider light spectrum (380 to 700 nm) 5 B cones see these colors G cones see these colors R cones see these colors Visual Acuity...
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Vision - Eye Anatomy 1 The eye works like a camera! 2 Lens...

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