Recycling Aluminum

Recycling Aluminum - Emily Bissel April 15, 2008 Lab...

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Unformatted text preview: Emily Bissel April 15, 2008 Lab Partners: Becca Angell & Meg Anders MS #1116 Tuesday PM Lab 11: Recycling Aluminum Introduction: Aluminum potassium sulfate dodecahydrate, most commonly known as Alum is an ionic compound that crystallizes when combined with solutions containing sulfate ions, the trivalent aluminum cation, and monovalent cation, potassium. Alum can also be considered a hydrated salt because it has twelve mols of water for every mole in the anhydrous compound. The use of alum is found in many every day processes including dyeing fabrics, antiperspirants, and tanning leather. The crystals can be formed through the combination of an aluminum can and a potassium hydroxide solution, though it is more common to synthesize alum from aluminum ore in commercial settings. The conversion of the Aluminum can requires a series of steps: In step one, The aluminum is combined with hydroxide to form tetrahydroxoaluminate and hydrogen: 2 Al (s) + 2OH- (aq) + 6H 2 O (l) 2Al(OH) 4- (aq) + 3 H 2 (g) In step two, sulfuric acid is added, neutralizing the excess hydroxide and dissolving the aluminum hydroxide: Al(OH) 4- (aq) + H + (aq) Al(OH) 3 (s) + H 2 O (l) In step three more sulfuric acid is added, neutralizing all of the hydroxide completely...
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Recycling Aluminum - Emily Bissel April 15, 2008 Lab...

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