behaviorism

Behaviorism - Erik Erikson an early 20th century Freudian ego-psychologist developed what he called the epigenetic principle Much like Freud's five

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Erik Erikson, an early 20 th century Freudian ego-psychologist, developed what he called the epigenetic principle. Much like Freud’s five stages of psychosexual development, Erikson’s personality theory is based upon eight stages of developmental life. Unlike Freud’s model, however, the epigenetic principle follows individuals throughout their entire life, rather than just through childhood, and is categorized by the eight psychosocial crises that individuals are said to experience at that stage – such as industry vs. inferiority in stage 4 at 7-12 years old, or integrity vs. despair in stage 8 at 50 or older. Erikson’s theory offers a solid explanation for psychological development as it takes into account personality growth during all stages of life and many psychologists since Erikson’s publication in 1959 have accepted the epigenetic principle as the leading theory of personality development. In considering deviation from the normal stages of development, one must
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This essay was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course PSYC 101 taught by Professor Graham during the Spring '07 term at UCSD.

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Behaviorism - Erik Erikson an early 20th century Freudian ego-psychologist developed what he called the epigenetic principle Much like Freud's five

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