language acquisition

language acquisition - The nativist theory of language...

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The nativist theory of language acquisition states that children are hard-wired with the ability to learn language and merely need exposure from adult speech production during the critical period – typically to age 12 – in order to develop knowledge of vocabulary and syntax. This theory incorporates both aspects of nature and nurture, and is supported by a number of field studies including those done on a deaf Nicaraguan population which revealed that children with no exposure to formalized language still develop a distinct language production mechanism, however lacking the syntactical clues unique to the society. Using the Chomsky model of language acquisition devises, it is possible for children to deduce complex rules of grammar and structure simply from exposure. Children exposed to two distinct languages during the critical period, however, are able to completely separate the two languages. The theory behind this is that children are capable of distinguishing the subtle complexities of grammar and structure between the
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language acquisition - The nativist theory of language...

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