lec 4.28 - Main Questions 1 How does food which is an...

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04/28/15 Main Questions: 1. How does food, which is an intimate part of our lives, enable us to think differently about the relationship between globalization and culture? 2. Food: about sustenance; the privilege of trying out different cuisines vs. food insecurity and malnutrition; fusion cuisine 3. How do we put this into historical perspective? - Symbolic significance of food - U.S. takes food for granted, for many people in U.S. food is relatively easily accessible. Consume for pleasure. - Los Angeles citizens have luxury to different food; we have opportunities to try out different cuisines vs. some parts of the world experiencing food insecurity, starvation and malnutrition. - This process of trying out different food and ingredients has happened historically. Very complex history, relate to cosmopolitan, also to slavery, industrial revolution, and indenture. - “Fusion cuisine” of what we think of has existing for many centuries. The circulation of good=> complex histories, e.g. slavery and industrial revolution. 1. How does food, which is an intimate part of our lives, enable us to think differently about the relationship between globalization and culture? a) The way capitalism and markets work today because we can access things not regional and across borders. The speed of circulation is unique to the contemporary moment. Ease of ingredients can travel and the speed of them. b) Diaspora and immigrating communities: they miss the food most. So many of these communities try to substitute or replicate or trying to adapt the land. For Los Angeles, its easier for people to get different food. c) Negative aspect: Circulation of food is contaminated; Global linkage of food: circulation of food is con? GMO ingredients imported from United States. d) Production and consumption of food is not local issue but global matter . Ex: global warming terrifies Australian. Serious to people living on agriculture. Agriculture sustainability is a global matter, global linkage around food. 2. Circulation of food in the pre-modern and early modern world.
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a) Food crop that circulated in the early modern world that really changes the shape of trade route and history in Europe and Asia: Pepper! Change the way empires were formed. Ex: Tea/ Coffee/ Salt/ Pepper/Potatoes/Tomatoes/ Chilies. After age of discovery. i. National Cuisines: ingredients we deem essential to national cuisines might not be native to those nations 1. New world crop: spaghetti/ tomato; tomato is not native to Italy.
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