Chapter 6 - Bone Tissue and the Skeletal System - CHAPTER 6...

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6|BONE TISSUE AND THESKELETAL SYSTEMFigure 6.1 Child Looking at BonesBone is a living tissue. Unlike the bones of a fossil made inert by a process ofmineralization, a child’s bones will continue to grow and develop while contributing to the support and function of otherbody systems. (credit: James Emery)IntroductionChapter ObjectivesAfter studying this chapter, you will be able to:List and describe the functions of bonesDescribe the classes of bonesDiscuss the process of bone formation and developmentExplain how bone repairs itself after a fractureDiscuss the effect of exercise, nutrition, and hormones on bone tissueDescribe how an imbalance of calcium can affect bone tissueBones make good fossils. While the soft tissue of a once living organism will decay and fall away over time, bone tissuewill, under the right conditions, undergo a process of mineralization, effectively turning the bone to stone. A well-preservedCHAPTER 6 | BONE TISSUE AND THE SKELETAL SYSTEM203Download for free at ."Bone Tissue and the Skeletal System" fromAnatomy and Physiologyby OpenStax College is available under aCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unportedlicense. © 2013, Rice University.
fossil skeleton can give us a good sense of the size and shape of an organism, just as your skeleton helps to define your sizeand shape. Unlike a fossil skeleton, however, your skeleton is a structure of living tissue that grows, repairs, and renewsitself. The bones within it are dynamic and complex organs that serve a number of important functions, including somenecessary to maintain homeostasis.6.1|The Functions of the Skeletal SystemBy the end of this section, you will be able to:Define bone, cartilage, and the skeletal systemList and describe the functions of the skeletal systemBone, orosseous tissue, is a hard, dense connective tissue that forms most of the adult skeleton, the support structureof the body. In the areas of the skeleton where bones move (for example, the ribcage and joints),cartilage, a semi-rigidform of connective tissue, provides flexibility and smooth surfaces for movement. Theskeletal systemis the body systemcomposed of bones and cartilage and performs the following critical functions for the human body:supports the bodyfacilitates movementprotects internal organsproduces blood cellsstores and releases minerals and fatSupport, Movement, and ProtectionThe most apparent functions of the skeletal system are the gross functions—those visible by observation. Simply by lookingat a person, you can see how the bones support, facilitate movement, and protect the human body.Just as the steel beams of a building provide a scaffold to support its weight, the bones and cartilage of your skeletalsystem compose the scaffold that supports the rest of your body. Without the skeletal system, you would be a limp mass oforgans, muscle, and skin.Bones also facilitate movement by serving as points of attachment for your muscles. While some bones only serve as

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