Split_routines_and_circuit_training

Split_routines_and_circuit_training - 22 / Split...

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Unformatted text preview: 22 / Split Routinegswand Circuit Training 278 KEEPING IT UP THERE are two main reasons people choose to split their routines. Some do it to cut down on training time — preferring to do fewer exercises per day than a total body workout involves. (Note: many who choose this first option also want to allow more time and energy each day for cardiovascular work.) The second and opposite reason is to allow more time to work out with weights. This .is actually the more common reason among serious weight trainers, and, as you become more acquainted with the wide variety of exercises possible, you too may find yourself wanting to split your work- outs to include several assistance exercises for each body part so that you can really concentrate on a particular area. The most common split is to do four workouts a week —— two upper— body workouts and two lower-body workouts — with abdominal work done all four days. Generally these are done on Monday—Tuesday and Thursday- Friday with Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday off; but some people prefer Tuesday-Thursday and Saturday—Sunday so they’ll have more time on the weekends for longer workouts. Lower-body workouts alternate with upper- body workouts to allow proper recovery. Some long-term trainers break their workouts down even further— using a six-day schedule that allows, for instance, two chest, shoulders, and triceps workouts, two upper back and biceps workouts, and two leg and hip workouts. This intense schedule is generally done only by experienced train- ers who have reached a high level of fitness that allows them to both recover and benefit from workouts such as these. Ian: “I trained on a six-day schedule during my final competitive years and during the eighteen months of my weight loss. But when I first started training, back in 1974, I trained only twice a week and moved to three days only after I’d gone through several cycles. I moved to six days mainly be— cause, when we were at Auburn University, we coached both men and women powerlifters and I was in the gym on a daily basis. I liked training that way, actually, and I made good gains, but after I dropped my body weight and leveled off, I cut back to a four-day routine simply because of time. Now, I train Monday-Wednesday, Friday—Saturday, and do aerobic work on the other three days.” If you’ve adapted well to the basic program and have the time and the intestinal fortitude, give split routines a try. Just remember that you don’t want to train your legs every day —— give them at least one and preferably two days to rest before you stress them with weights again. Since split rou- tines grew out of the desire for greater diversity, you’ll note in some of the samples that while both workouts for the lower-body, for instance, are simi- lar, they are not necessarily exactly the same. Many trainers make some substitutions in their split routines in order to work the muscles in as many ways as possible. Also, most lifters find that certain particularly exhausting exercises — especially the deadlift — can’t be borne more than once a week. Again, look at all the sample routines that follow, study the patterns, and review the Tips for each exercise before committing yourself. This introductory four-day split routine should follow completion of the Split-Routine A basic cycle and the expanded basic cycle. If an exercise is indicated as being “heavy” on Monday, then it would be “light” (85%) on Thursday, etc. This applies to both the upper- and lower-body days. Mondays and Thursdays -— Upper Tuesdays and Fridays — Lower Body Body Stretching High Pull — Heavy Wide-Grip Lat Pulldown —— Heavy Squat — Light Dumbbell Rowing Motion — Heavy Leg Extension — Light Bench Press — Light Leg Curl — Light Dumbbell Fly —— Light Calf Raise — Light Triceps Press — Light Seated Twist Curl —— Light Side bend Sit-up Leg Raises SPLIT ROUTINES AND CIRCUIT TRAINING 279 sp|it Routine 3 Ian: “This is my four-day-per-week routine that I’ve been doing since our move to Texas. Since my body weight has stabilized and I’m not training for a powerlifting competition, this could, I suppose, be called a ‘mainte- nance’ program. One of the things I’m trying to ‘maintain’ is some extra size in my upper body so that my proportions are better. That’s why there’s so much emphasis on upper-body work. Please remember that this would have to be considered an advanced routine. Don’t try to do this many exercises in one workout until you’ve trained for quite a while, if you work close to your limit as we recommend. Note that I deadlift only once a week, doing high pulls on the other leg and hip day. I also have some slight variations in my upper-body work.” a " Monday Friday Stretching Stretching Bench Press —— Heavy Wide-Grip Lat Pulldown — Heavy Incline Dumbbell Press — Heavy Close-Grip Lat Pulldown — Heavy Incline Dumbbell Fly — Heavy Dumbbell Rowing Motion — Heavy Press behind Neck — Heavy Bench Press — Light Close-Grip Bench Press — Heavy Incline Barbell Press —-Light Dip Decline Dumbbell Fly Triceps Pressdown — Heavy - Press behind Neck — Light Wide—Grip Lat Pulldown — Light Close-Grip Bench Press —— Light Close-Grip Lat Pulldown —— Light Triceps Pressdown ~—— Light Dumbbell Rowing Motion — Light Curl —— Heavy Curl — Light Sit—up Sit-up Leg Raise Leg Raise Saturday Wednesday Stretching Stretching Squat —— Heavy Deadlift — Heavy High Pull Squat —— Light Lunge — Light Lunge —— Light Leg Extension — Light Leg Press — Light « Leg Curl — Light Leg Extention — Light Sit-up J ackknife Side bend Standing Twist 280 KEEPING IT UP This is a six-day-per-week routine for advanced trainers. 3pm Routine c Monday-Friday Thursday (Make Monday heavy and Friday Stretching light) Stiff-Leg Deadlift Stretching _ Power Snatch Chin Leg Press — Light Wide-Grip Lat Pulldown Lunge Close-Grip Lat Pulldown Leg Curl —— Light Curl-Bar Curl Leg Extension '— Light Concentration Curl Bent-Leg Sit-up Bent-Leg Sit-up Hanging Knee-in Sunday Stretching Tuesday-Saturday Squat —— Heavy (Make Tuesday light and Saturday Leg Press —— Heavy heavy) Leg Extension —— Heavy Stretching Leg Curl — Heavy Bench Press Calf Raise Incline Press Hyperextension Seated Dumbbell Press Crunch Front Raise with Dumbbell Seated Twist Curl-Bar Triceps Press Triceps Pressdown Seated Twist Side bend Crunch Ian: “This is the six-day-per—week routine that I used to train for the Split Routine D 1983 Women’s Nationals, at which I weighed 146 pounds and made a world-record deadlift. It is the hardest workout routine I’ve ever done in my many years of training. Some exercises are grouped together to indicate that they were done in what are called ‘supersets,’ meaning that one exercise was done immediately after another exercise had been completed. Then after both (or more) exercise sets had been completed, I took a short rest before proceeding to the next superset. This routine is exceptionally long — I would never recommend that anyone do this many exercises at a time. I did it because I wanted to create rapid changes as I lost my body weight and be- cause, once I got started on this high-level training, I got hooked. I liked the SPLIT ROUTINES AND CIRCUIT TRAINING 281 282 KEEPING IT UP Dumbbell Press way all the upper-body work helped my figure become more proportional and how much larger my bust measurement got, even though I was losing weight, not to mention how strong I was getting everywhere. During this cycle I also did a lot of powerwalking, with added weight, and rode my bicy- cle at least three times a week. However, as I got close to the contest, I cut back drastically on my cycling and powerwalking to saVe my energies for my workouts. After the meet was over, I Went right back to my aerobics and started another cycle.“ Monday-Friday (Monday light and Friday heavy) Stretching Chin Wide-Grip Lat Pulldown Close-Grip Lat Pulldown Seated Cable Pull Dumbbell Rowing Motion Curl—Bar Curl Concentration Curl Abdominal Work Superset Superset Tuesday-Saturday (Tuesday light and Saturday heavy) Bench Press Incline Dumbbell Press Decline Dumbbell Press Decline Dumbbell fly Press behind Neck Superset Superset Front Raise with Dumbbell Side Lateral Rear-.Deltoid Raise Triceps Press Triceps Pressdown Abdominal Work Superset Thursday Stretching Deadljft Squat — Lift Leg Press — Light Lunge — Light Leg Curl — Light Leg Extension — Light Abdominal Work Superset Sunday Stretching . Squat — Heavy Partial Squat Partial Deadlift below Knee Leg Press —— Heavy Lunge — Heavy Leg Curl — Heavy Leg Extension — Heavy Abdominal Work Superset Throughout this book we have encouraged you to train as rapidly as possible in order to get maximum aerobic benefit from your weight workouts. If your time is very limited, however, and you want to try to really squeeze a lot of aerobic benefit from your weight workouts, you might want to give circuit training a try. Popular with many coaches because it is an efficient way to put large groups of people through a workout and because it builds endur- ance as well as some muscular strength, circuit training is still not a method used much by those who train outside of institutional settings. Who knows why? Perhaps because it doesn’t build strength and muscle as well as stan« dard training; or perhaps because you don’t get that feeling of a good, tight pump, since your blood is rushing hither and yon over your entire body in- stead of engorging one particular area at a time, or perhaps because it’s a tough routine to follow on a regular basis. ‘ To do circuit training you need either a multistation weight-training machine or enough equipment at your home or gym to set up five or six dif- ferent exercises so you are able to move from one to another without stop~ ping. This is often tough in many gyms because you have to share equipment and sometimes wait in lines. However, with two bars and some dumbbells, you can easily do circuit training at home. Simply set up a pat- tern of exercises such as this: squat, bench press, lat pulldown, lunge, curl, triceps press, squat, bench press, etc. Continue moving from exercise to ex- ercise until five sets of each exercise have been done and follow the princi- ples of periodization as much as possible. Circuit training works well during the Hypertrophy stage of periodization, though we would not recommend it during Power. For that phase you need to take more time, concentrate on increasing your poundages, and do activities such as cycling and power~ walking for your aerobics. But if you want cardiovascular improvement to the max, research has shown that circuit training does produce marked aerobic benefits. In fact, in a study done by Drs. Paul Ward, Larry Gettman, and R. D. Hagan, it was found that a group of men doing only Circuit training made just as much aer» obic improvement as another group who did circuit training and jogging. The trick to aerobic improvement from circuit training is to keep your pulse elevated for long periods of time. This is great if you’ve got the stamina for it, though we admit we’ve found it a hard way to train for more than a few weeks at a time. If you do want to give circuit training a try, alternate lower-body and upper-body exercises. Here are two sample routines, which could be used on alternate workout days. Make sure to stretch before beginning your weight work. Sample Circuit 1 Sample Circuit 2 Squat High Pull Bench Press Incline Press Lunge Leg Press Overhead Dumbbell Press Bench Press Leg Curl Lunge Curl-Bar Curl Triceps Pressdown Bent-Leg Sit-up Bent—Leg Sit-up .QPIJT RnIITINEs AND CIRCUIT TRAINING 282 ...
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course PED 106C taught by Professor Beckwith during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Split_routines_and_circuit_training - 22 / Split...

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