D1 D3 Training Rooms

D1 D3 Training Rooms - Athletic Training Rooms Division I...

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Athletic Training Rooms
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Division I college and Division III college athletic training rooms have many differences and similarities. While each serve the purpose of treating and rehabilitating injured athletes, the training rooms can differ in size, personnel, equipment, and their budget. There are staples of equipment and personnel that each athletic training room carries out of necessity, however, there are no standards stating that a Division I training room has to be bigger and better than a Division III training room. There are many athletic training rooms in each division that resemble each other. For instance, Endicott College, a Division III facility, resembles a Division I college in some aspects of their athletic training program, and there are plenty of Division I facilities that resemble Division III schools. In this paper, we will discuss the differences and similarities between Division I and Division III schools, as well as how our school, Endicott College, compares to the average. We conducted interviews with a Division I athlete, a Division III athlete, a Division I basketball manager, and a Division III trainer to gain input on our findings. To begin our comparison, personnel often differs between Division I colleges and Division III colleges. Many Division III colleges will not employ full-time athletic trainers, which hinder their athletic programs, but saves them money. If they do employ full-time trainers, there are usually less of them, ranging between three and six trainers, depending on budget and the amount of athletic teams. (Rubley, UNLV) Division I colleges will have anywhere between four to eight trainers, including a head trainer. These staff members are full-time employees who keep extensive hours, and do end up costing the university money. However, Division I colleges can usually afford to pay the higher salaries in order to comply with their athletes, who hold more prestige. Also, many
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Division III colleges don’t offer a very highly respected Athletic Training major for their students, so they do not have undergraduates working in the training room and/or with the athletic teams, whereas many, if not all, of the Division I colleges do have their Athletic Training majors gaining experience. Robert Brickley, a Division I soccer player at University of Connecticut, says “At any given time, there is a trainer in the Athletic Training room, supervising at least three (third year standing) Athletic Training majors, and there is a trainer with every team in season as well as a mess of Athletic Training majors who rotate between the Athletic Training room and the different in-season teams.” However, one similarity you will find in every Division I college and Division III college recognized by the NCAA is that every trainer employed by each individual college will be NATA (National Athletic Trainers Association) certified, as well as C.P.R., A.E.D, and first-aid certified, as well as licensed by the specific state they are employed in. This
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course SM 123 taught by Professor Roderick during the Spring '08 term at Endicott.

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D1 D3 Training Rooms - Athletic Training Rooms Division I...

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