Film III - Film III By Assem Nasr Wednesday This Week...

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Film III By Assem Nasr Wednesday October 18, 2006 This Week Readings: Course Packet: Postman, “The Age of Show Business” Screening: Good Night and Good Luck Today’s Lecture Film: Formula, Frames, and Functions Visual Tools » Frames » Lighting » Mise-en-scene » Sound » Editing Classical Hollywood Style Independent and International Films Critical Distance and Textual Readings Portrayals Us vs. Others Beyond the Image Voyerism Lacan Feminism Calling the Shots Establishing Shot Establishes the location Long Shot Defines the setting and mood Medium Shot Conveys character’s physical traits, and relation to surroundings Close Up Focuses viewer on intensity, emotion, detail Calling the Shots Point-of-View (POV) Other: Dutch Angle Tracking shot Camera movement
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Going Tungsten Light conveying mood and character: Dark Bright Selective lighting Shadows Day for night Mise-en-Scene Mise-en-Scene Term adopted from theater meaning “staging” In film language: setting - everything that appears in frame (character, lighting, dress, set, and movement) Trivia: In Hollywood films, because directors did not have control over script, they would make their creative mark using stylized mise-en-scene
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This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course RTF 07885 taught by Professor Nasr during the Fall '07 term at University of Texas.

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Film III - Film III By Assem Nasr Wednesday This Week...

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