NR 469 SU 15 Seizures revised again - Seizures\/Epilepsy Seizure activityspreads

NR 469 SU 15 Seizures revised again - Seizures/Epilepsy...

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Seizures/Epilepsy
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Seizure A seizure is the physical manifestation of a  sudden disruption of orderly communication  between neurons in the brain A seizure can take a variety of forms,  depending on where the disruption occurs and  how far the resulting abnormal electrical  activity spreads
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Epilepsy   is one of the most common disorders of the  nervous system, affecting more than 3 million Americans While epilepsy can develop at any time of life, the  occurrence of new cases is more common in  children  and in  people older than 60 years of age In most cases, the cause of epilepsy is unknown The word “epilepsy” is derived from a Greek word  meaning “to seize” Many notable people in history have been diagnosed with or  are believed to have had some form of epilepsy, including: Julius Caesar Albert Einstein  Agatha Christie
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Epilepsy vs. Seizures A seizure is defined by release of excessive and uncontrolled electrical activity in the brain. Seizures themselves are not a disease, they are an event . Epilepsy (seizure disorder ) is a neurological condition , that in different times produce brief disturbances in the electrical functions of the brain. Seizures are  a symptom of epilepsy
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Underlying illness
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Precipitating Events:   Non-epileptic seizures Fever Stress/fatigue induced Withdrawal seizures of alcoholics Infectious diseases Do not require anticonvulsants
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Precipitating Events:  Epileptic Seizures Anxiety or apprehension Bright lights (video games?) Certain smells Fatigue (sleep deprivation) Recreational drugs Concurrent illness Psychological stress Non-compliance with seizure  medications Menstrual periods Other precipitating events No known precipitating event
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Kinds of Seizure
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Defining Different Seizure Types Partial seizures Seizures that initially affect  one specific area in one  hemisphere of the brain   May or may not cause an 
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  • Summer '15
  • CatherineBoccanfuso
  • Neurology, Seizure, Seizures

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