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IPSD v Doe Editorial - Why can’t we pray at schools...

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Tim Thyne Period 2 1/5/01 IPSD v. Doe Editorial On January 5, 2001, the Supreme Court knocked off the new millennium by debating the first amendment. Although there have been several cases having to do with the first amendment, this case is unique. It is unique, because it debates some of the “implied” elements of the amendment vs. the actual law. The case came about when two parents got upset when at the public high school that their children attended, a nonsectarian and nonproselytizing prayer was said by a student before the beginning of a football game. Although the case was short, it was important to schools and to several students it was life changing, especially states along the “Bible Belt”. The Petitioners debated that the students that did not want to hear the prayer could have come later to the game or that they could just not listen. Petitioner Attorney George Mugel asks, “We can pray in malls if we want.
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Unformatted text preview: Why can’t we pray at schools before football games?” In response, George I’ll meet you on Saturday for the pre-shopping prayer. Hey, as long as it’s nonsectarian and nonproselytizing. George also states, “We should not be blind.” I agree . . . In reply to the Petitioners, the Respondents argued that the students could not avoid a prayer that was said through a public announcement system. While the Justices were meeting alone, I got to sit in with the Attorneys as both the Petitioner and the Respondent continued to discuss the case. One of the petitioners stated that the 1 st Amendment only implies the separation between church and state. They also charged that the petitioner’s side of the case had more points. The Respondents agreed saying that they only had one good point, only to find out that that one point won the case for them....
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  • Spring '08
  • HIGGINS
  • Supreme Court of the United States, First Amendment to the United States Constitution, Separation of church and state, Petitioner Attorney George, George Mugel

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