{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

WWII- Paper#2 - O'Reilly 1 Tyler O'Reilly Dr Kisatsky West...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
O’Reilly 1 Tyler O’Reilly Dr. Kisatsky West and the World II 21 March 2007 Defense of the Human Race: Account of the Disclosure of the Horrid Realities Present in the Belgian Congo In the late nineteenth century, the Congo Free State was home to a system of horrific forced labor that cost ten million Africans their lives. The head of this operation, King Leopold II, relished the profits the slavery in the Congo produced, while the rest of the world remained uninformed of the inhumane routines that Africans were forced into everyday. Many stood in complete ignorance or intentional disregard of the atrocities existent in the Congo; however, the few men who questioned this dubious project and possessed the courage to stand up to the formidable King Leopold II risked their lives for the entire Congo population. Without the unprecedented efforts of many willing Congo reformers—notably George Washington Williams, William Henry Sheppard, Edmund Dene Morel, and Sir Roger Casement—Leopold II’s harsh treatment would have stayed behind the walls of his false philanthropic claims and many more African lives would have been lost to the brutality of this regime. George Washington Williams lived a very eccentric, unconventional life, completing everything from fighting in the civil war and holding sporadic jobs to becoming a pastor and lawyer in Massachusetts. Williams was enlightened to the harsh realities of the Congo while attending a meeting with President Chester A. Arthur at the White House. President Arthur introduced Williams to Henry Shelton Sanford, who was
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
O’Reilly 2 in Washington lobbying for United States recognition and intervention of the Belgian Congo. Always having an intense interest in the Congo Free State, Williams became intrigued with what Sanford had to say and ended up conducting a face-to-face interview with King Leopold, himself. Unaware of the inhumane practices Leopold was conducting in the Congo, Williams described him as “a pleasant and entertaining conversationalist” (George Washington Williams, 106). On the eve of his expedition, Williams was urged by the King to post pone his trip for at least five years. Determined to gather material for his upcoming book, Williams adamantly refused and began his journey to the Congo, a trip that would have more impact on his life and the lives of millions of Africans than he could have ever imagined. Expecting the peacefully ruled colony described by Henry Morton Stanley and many others, Williams was shocked to discover what he referred to as “the Siberia of the African Continent” (George Washington Williams, 108). After seeing the Africans being fooled into forfeiting their land, the excessive cruelty towards the inhabitants, and the buying and selling of slaves as simple commodities, Williams, inundated with rage and hostility, poured his anger into an Open Letter to King Leopold. This letter, published widely, was concerned with human rights and contained many accusations toward the king and his regime.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern