Chapter_10s

Chapter_10s - Chapter 10 Biological Productivity in the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 10 Biological Productivity in the Ocean
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
An ecosystem is the totality of the environment, encompassing all chemical, physical, geological, and biological parts. Ecosystems function by the exchange of matter and energy among the organisms. Plants use chlorophyll in photosynthesis to convert inorganic material into organic compounds and to store energy for growth and reproduction. Plants are autotrophs and are the primary producers in most ecosystems. Food Webs and Trophic Dynamics Diatoms Dinoflagellate Saltmarsh plants Seagrass Kelp Algae
Background image of page 2
All other organisms are heterotrophs , the consumers and decomposers in ecosystems. Herbivores eat plants, and carnivores eat animals. Matter is constantly recycled, but energy gradually dissipates as heat and is lost. Food Webs and Trophic Dynamics Copepod Anchovy Dolphin
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Food Webs and Trophic Dynamics A more complex ecosystem model. An ecosystem model
Background image of page 4
Trophic refers to nutrition. Trophic dynamics is the study of the nutritional interconnections among organisms. Trophic level is the position of an organism within the trophic structure of an ecosystem. Autotrophs form the first trophic level. Herbivores are the second trophic level. Carnivores occupy the third and higher trophic levels. Decomposers form the terminal level. Food Webs and Trophic Dynamics
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A food chain is the succession of organisms within an ecosystem based upon trophic dynamics. (Who is eaten by whom.) A food web consists of interconnected and interdependent food chains. Food Webs and Trophic Dynamics Food Web Food Chain
Background image of page 6
An energy pyramid is the graphic representation of a food chain in terms of the total energy contained at each trophic level. Food Webs and Trophic Dynamics Energy Pyramid
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Plants are the primary producers. They require sunlight, nutrients, water, and carbon dioxide for photosynthesis. Because carbon dioxide and water are abundant in the ocean, sunlight and nutrients are the limiting factors. The formula for photosynthesis is: Sunlight + 6 CO 2 + 6 H 2 O C 6 H 12 O 6 (=sugar) + 6 O 2 Phytoplankton blooms are the rapid expansion of a phytoplankton population because light and nutrients become temporarily abundant. Food Webs and Trophic Dynamics
Background image of page 8
Animals must consume pre-existing organic material to survive. • Animals break down organic compounds into inorganic components to obtain the stored energy. • The chemical formula for respiration is: C 6 H 12 O 6 (sugar) + 6 O 2 6 CO 2 + 6 H 2 O + energy Food Webs and Trophic Dynamics
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The energy obtained from food is used for movement, reproduction, and growth. The food consumed by most organisms
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/13/2008 for the course OCE 1001 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at FSU.

Page1 / 49

Chapter_10s - Chapter 10 Biological Productivity in the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online