Lecture16 - Caterpillar Pests Decision Factors The threat...

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Caterpillar Pests- Decision Factors The threat  Plant health Site conditions  Abundance of pest Client Concerns Regulatory Concerns
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Types-  Exposed, Concealed Abundance – Solitary, or Gregarious? Host Range – What do they eat? Number of Generations /Year Abundance of Natural  Enemies Caterpillar Pests- Decision Factors
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Pesticides for Controlling Caterpillars Biologicals Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) Spinosad (Conserve, Fertilome etc) Insect Growth Regulators Diflubenzuron = Dimilin Fenoxycarb = Precision Tebufenozide = Confirm Pyriproxifen = Distance Neem, Azadirachtin
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Pyrethroids- Rescue Treatments Bifenthrin (Talstar) *M Cyfluthrin (Decathalon) *HO Deltamethrin (Deltagard) Fluvalinate (Mavrik) *HO Lamda -Cyhalothrin (Scimitar, Battle) *M Permethrin (Astro, Spectracide) *B, *HO *M = miticide ; *B = borers; *HO= Products available for home owners
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The Attack of the Amazing Gypsy Moth: Living with an Invasive Exotic Pest  History of Gypsy Moth  The Threat   Biology  Biological Control  Gypsy Moth Management  Population/Panic Cycle  Slow the Spread  Suppression  Education
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Map of the Gypsy Moth Regulated (Quarantined) Area   Map of the Gypsy Moth Regulated Area Introduced into western Massachusetts in 1869 • Now established in Northeastern states, Michigan, parts of Ohio, Wisconsin and 5 counties in Indiana
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Why Gypsy Moth Is A Problem • Caterpillars eat leaves of 500 species of trees and plants • 8 million acres of forested lands defoliated in 1990 • Preferred trees - oaks • Repeated annual defoliation may kill trees in 2-4 years
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How Gypsy Moths Defoliate Leaves: • Caterpillars eat everything  but the  leaf midrib • 11 sq. ft. of foliage consumed    by each caterpillar Trees: • Eggs laid in groups of 50-1500 • Caterpillars hatching from 100 egg  masses will consume over  3 acres of foliage • During pest outbreaks each tree  can have more than 200 egg  masses How Gypsy Moth Defoliate
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When are forests  defoliated? • Defoliation starts in May and  continues into early June • A second set of new leaves  come out in July
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Adult Egg Laying • White female moths emerge from  brown pupae and lay large hidden  egg masses • Often found on trees, house siding,  firewood and under car bumpers • Sheer number insects can be  nuisance during outbreak
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Gypsy Moth Outbreaks Cause Household Nuisance • After defoliation, caterpillars wander long distances searching for food  and places to make pupae • Caterpillars crawl across lawns, and can cover the sides of houses.
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