Chapter 13 key controversy

Chapter 13 key controversy - preserved as a kind of perfect...

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Chris Gonzalez Chapter 13 Key Controversy: Pompeii – All Problems Solved? Pompeii is the most thorough urban excavation ever undertaken, and its range of finds,  from wall paintings to latrines, provides predictable illustration for innumerable textbooks on  Roman art and archaeology. The very nature of its destruction, buried and preserved by a layer  of ash and volcanic pumice, lends it a unique appeal: the existence of houses with walls, streets  with sidewalks, and the evocative remains if the unfortunate humans and animals trapped by  the ash of Vesuvius explain why Pompeii is one of the most frequently visited archaeology  places in the world. This quite extraordinary and tantalizing degree of site preservation,  extending right down to the discovery of food sitting ready to eat on the table, has tended to  lead archaeological interpretation astray. Pompeii has been envisioned as a city frozen in time, 
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Unformatted text preview: preserved as a kind of perfect time capsule from the Roman past. What the Pompeii premise ignores is the all-too-often confused nature of site creation and interpretation, as well as the significant impact of post-depositional taphonomic processes. Even more troubling, the unquestioning adoption of the Pompeii premise long prevented a range of interesting questions being asked about the site. By focusing solely on the moment of destruction in AD 79, for example, investigation of the sites previous centuries of existence as an Oscan community and later as a colony of Roman veterans was precluded. Pompeii, the best known of all Roman cities, became Roman rather gradually, but that process, and its pre-Roman origins, has only recently begun to be seriously explored....
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