Ch 8t - Chapter 8: Prokaryotic and Organellar Genomes Bio...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 8: Prokaryotic and Organellar Genomes Bio 4306 Lecture Outlines Prokaryotic Genomes: The E. coli genome is a circular ds DNA. It really isnt a chromosome like our chromosomes, but is found in a structure called a nucleoid. Some prokaryotic genomes are linear, not circular. Fig. 8.2: Why does supercoiling occur (what does it relieve?)? What is the advantage to supercoiling? Fig. 8.3: The nucleoid structure. Fig. 8.5: Plasmids are the trading cards of prokaryotes. They give the possessor certain special powers (Table 8.1), but they are not absolutely essential under normal conditions. Some weird bacteria have much of their DNA in plasmid form, but even with these, the plasmids could be ultimately dispensible. Fig. 8.6 and 8.7: The E. coli genome is packed with genes. It is less than 5 Mb, as are most prokaryotic genomes (Table 8.3). Fig. 8.8: What is an operon? What does the operon mRNA look like? It used to be thought that all the genes of an operon are related, but genome sequencing has found some puzzling combinations of genes in...
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Ch 8t - Chapter 8: Prokaryotic and Organellar Genomes Bio...

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