Math240 Solutions - 1 Introduction to Differential...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Introduction to Differential Equations Exercises 1.1 1. Second-order; linear. 2. Third-order; nonlinear because of (dy/dx)4 . 3. The differential equation is first-order. Writing it in the form x(dy/dx) + y 2 = 1, we see that it is nonlinear in y because of y 2 . However, writing it in the form (y 2 − 1)(dx/dy) + x = 0, we see that it is linear in x. 4. The differential equation is first-order. Writing it in the form u(dv/du) + (1 + u)v = ueu we see that it is linear in v. However, writing it in the form (v + uv − ueu )(du/dv) + u = 0, we see that it is nonlinear in u. 5. Fourth-order; linear 6. Second-order; nonlinear because of cos(r + u) 7. Second-order; nonlinear because of 1 + (dy/dx)2 8. Second-order; nonlinear because of 1/R2 9. Third-order; linear 10. Second-order; nonlinear because of x2 ˙ 11. From y = e−x/2 we obtain y = − 1 e−x/2 . Then 2y + y = −e−x/2 + e−x/2 = 0. 2 12. From y = 6 5 − 6 e−20t we obtain dy/dt = 24e−20t , so that 5 dy + 20y = 24e−20t + 20 dt 6 6 −20t − e 5 5 13. From y = e3x cos 2x we obtain y = 3e3x cos 2x − 2e3x sin 2x and y y − 6y + 13y = 0. = 24. = 5e3x cos 2x − 12e3x sin 2x, so that 14. From y = − cos x ln(sec x + tan x) we obtain y = −1 + sin x ln(sec x + tan x) and y = tan x + cos x ln(sec x + tan x). Then y + y = tan x. 15. Writing ln(2X − 1) − ln(X − 1) = t and differentiating implicitly we obtain X 2 dX 1 dX − =1 2X − 1 dt X − 1 dt 2 1 − 2X − 1 X − 1 4 2 dX =1 dt -4 2X − 2 − 2X + 1 dX =1 (2X − 1)(X − 1) dt -2 2 4 t -2 dX = −(2X − 1)(X − 1) = (X − 1)(1 − 2X). dt -4 Exponentiating both sides of the implicit solution we obtain 2X − 1 et − 1 = et =⇒ 2X − 1 = Xet − et =⇒ (et − 1) = (et − 2)X =⇒ X = t . X −1 e −2 Solving et − 2 = 0 we get t = ln 2. Thus, the solution is defined on (−∞, ln 2) or on (ln 2, ∞). The graph of the solution defined on (−∞, ln 2) is dashed, and the graph of the solution defined on (ln 2, ∞) is solid. 1 Exercises 1.1 16. Implicitly differentiating the solution we obtain y dy dy −2x2 − 4xy + 2y = 0 =⇒ −x2 dy − 2xy dx + y dy = 0 dx dx =⇒ 2xy dx + (x2 − y)dy = 0. 4 2 Using the quadratic formula to solve y 2 − 2x2 y − 1 = 0 for y, we get √ √ y = 2x2 ± 4x4 + 4 /2 = x2 ± x4 + 1 . Thus, two explicit solutions are √ √ y1 = x2 + x4 + 1 and y2 = x2 − x4 + 1 . Both solutions are defined on -4 -2 2 4 x -2 (−∞, ∞). The graph of y1 (x) is solid and the graph of y2 is dashed. -4 17. Differentiating P = c1 et / (1 + c1 et ) we obtain dP (1 + c1 et ) c1 et − c1 et · c1 et = 2 dt (1 + c1 et ) = x 2 18. Differentiating y = e−x c1 et [(1 + c1 et ) − c1 et ] = P (1 − P ). 1 + c1 et 1 + c1 et 2 2 et dt + c1 e−x we obtain 0 2 2 x 2 y = e−x ex − 2xe−x 0 2 2 x 2 et dt − 2c1 xe−x = 1 − 2xe−x 0 2 2 et dt − 2c1 xe−x . Substituting into the differential equation, we have x 2 y + 2xy = 1 − 2xe−x 19. From y = c1 e2x + c2 xe2x we obtain 0 2 2 x 2 et dt − 2c1 xe−x + 2xe−x 2 2 et dt + 2c1 xe−x = 1. 0 dy d2 y = (2c1 + c2 )e2x + 2c2 xe2x and = (4c1 + 4c2 )e2x + 4c2 xe2x , so that dx dx2 d2 y dy −4 + 4y = (4c1 + 4c2 − 8c1 − 4c2 + 4c1 )e2x + (4c2 − 8c2 + 4c2 )xe2x = 0. 2 dx dx 20. From y = c1 x−1 + c2 x + c3 x ln x + 4x2 we obtain dy = −c1 x−2 + c2 + c3 + c3 ln x + 8x, dx d2 y = 2c1 x−3 + c3 x−1 + 8, dx2 and d3 y = −6c1 x−4 − c3 x−2 , dx3 so that x3 d3 y d2 y dy + 2x2 2 − x +y 3 dx dx dx = (−6c1 + 4c1 + c1 + c1 )x−1 + (−c3 + 2c3 − c2 − c3 + c2 )x = 12x2 . 21. From y = −x2 , 2 x , x<0 x≥0 + (−c3 + c3 )x ln x + (16 − 8 + 4)x2 we obtain y = −2x, 2x, x<0 so that xy − 2y = 0. x≥0 2 Exercises 1.1 22. The function y(x) is not continuous at x = 0 since lim y(x) = 5 and lim y(x) = −5. Thus, y (x) does not x→0+ x→0− exist at x = 0. 23. From x = e−2t + 3e6t and y = −e−2t + 5e6t we obtain dx = −2e−2t + 18e6t dt and dy = 2e−2t + 30e6t . dt Then x + 3y = (e−2t + 3e6t ) + 3(−e−2t + 5e6t ) dx = −2e−2t + 18e6t = dt and 5x + 3y = 5(e−2t + 3e6t ) + 3(−e−2t + 5e6t ) dy = 2e−2t + 30e6t = . dt 24. From x = cos 2t + sin 2t + 1 et and y = − cos 2t − sin 2t − 1 et we obtain 5 5 and dx 1 = −2 sin 2t + 2 cos 2t + et dt 5 and dy 1 = 2 sin 2t − 2 cos 2t − et dt 5 d2 x 1 = −4 cos 2t − 4 sin 2t + et dt2 5 and d2 y 1 = 4 cos 2t + 4 sin 2t − et . dt2 5 Then and 1 4y + et = 4(− cos 2t − sin 2t − et ) + et 5 1 d2 x = −4 cos 2t − 4 sin 2t + et = 2 5 dt 1 4x − et = 4(cos 2t + sin 2t + et ) − et 5 1 d2 y = 4 cos 2t + 4 sin 2t − et = 2 . 5 dt 25. An interval on which tan 5t is continuous is −π/2 < 5t < π/2, so 5 tan 5t will be a solution on (−π/10, π/10). 26. For (1 − sin t)−1/2 to be continuous we must have 1 − sin t > 0 or sin t < 1. Thus, (1 − sin t)−1/2 will be a solution on (π/2, 5π/2). 27. (y )2 + 1 = 0 has no real solution. 28. The only solution of (y )2 + y 2 = 0 is y = 0, since if y = 0, y 2 > 0 and (y )2 + y 2 ≥ y 2 > 0. 29. The first derivative of f (t) = et is et . The first derivative of f (t) = ekt is kekt . The differential equations are y = y and y = ky, respectively. 30. Any function of the form y = cet or y = ce−t is its own second derivative. The corresponding differential equation is y − y = 0. Functions of the form y = c sin t or y = c cos t have second derivatives that are the negatives of themselves. The differential equation is y + y = 0. 31. Since the nth derivative of φ(x) must exist if φ(x) is a solution of the nth order differential equation, all lowerorder derivatives of φ(x) must exist and be continuous. [Recall that a differentiable function is continuous.] 32. Solving the system c1 y1 (0) + c2 y2 (0) = 2 c1 y1 (0) + c2 y2 (0) = 0 3 Exercises 1.1 for c1 and c2 we get c1 = 2y2 (0) y1 (0)y2 (0) − y1 (0)y2 (0) and c2 = − Thus, a particular solution is y= 2y1 (0) . y1 (0)y2 (0) − y1 (0)y2 (0) 2y2 (0) 2y1 (0) y1 − y2 , y1 (0)y2 (0) − y1 (0)y2 (0) y1 (0)y2 (0) − y1 (0)y2 (0) where we assume that y1 (0)y2 (0) − y1 (0)y2 (0) = 0. 33. For the first-order differential equation integrate f (x). For the second-order differential equation integrate twice. In the latter case we get y = ( f (t)dt)dt + c1 t + c2 . 34. Solving for y using the quadratic formula we obtain the two differential equations y = 1 2 + 2 1 + 3t6 t and y = 1 2−2 t 1 + 3t6 , so the differential equation cannot be put in the form dy/dt = f (t, y). 35. The differential equation yy − ty = 0 has normal form dy/dt = t. These are not equivalent because y = 0 is a solution of the first differential equation but not a solution of the second. 36. Differentiating we get y = c1 + 3c2 t2 and y = 6c2 t. Then c2 = y /6t and c1 = y − ty /2, so y= y − ty 2 y 6t t+ 1 t3 = ty − t2 y 3 and the differential equation is t2 y − 3ty + 3y = 0. 37. (a) From y = emt we obtain y = memt . Then y + 2y = 0 implies memt + 2emt = (m + 2)emt = 0. Since emt > 0 for all t, m = −2. Thus y = e−2t is a solution. (b) From y = emt we obtain y = memt and y = m2 emt . Then y − 5y + 6y = 0 implies m2 emt − 5memt + 6emt = (m − 2)(m − 3)emt = 0. Since emt > 0 for all t, m = 2 and m = 3. Thus y = e2t and y = e3t are solutions. (c) From y = tm we obtain y = mtm−1 and y = m(m − 1)tm−2 . Then ty + 2y = 0 implies tm(m − 1)tm−2 + 2mtm−1 = [m(m − 1) + 2m]tm−1 = (m2 + m)tm−1 = m(m + 1)tm−1 = 0. Since tm−1 > 0 for t > 0, m = 0 and m = −1. Thus y = 1 and y = t−1 are solutions. (d) From y = tm we obtain y = mtm−1 and y = m(m − 1)tm−2 . Then t2 y − 7ty + 15y = 0 implies t2 m(m − 1)tm−2 − 7tmtm−1 + 15tm = [m(m − 1) − 7m + 15]tm = (m2 − 8m + 15)tm = (m − 3)(m − 5)tm = 0. Since tm > 0 for t > 0, m = 3 and m = 5. Thus y = t3 and y = t5 are solutions. 38. When g(t) = 0, y = 0 is a solution of a linear equation. 39. (a) Solving (10 − 5y)/3x = 0 we see that y = 2 is a constant solution. (b) Solving y 2 + 2y − 3 = (y + 3)(y − 1) = 0 we see that y = −3 and y = 1 are constant solutions. (c) Since 1/(y − 1) = 0 has no solutions, the differential equation has no constant solutions. 4 Exercises 1.1 (d) Setting y = 0 we have y = 0 and 6y = 10. Thus y = 5/3 is a constant solution. 40. From y = (1 − y)/(x − 2) we see that a tangent line to the graph of y(x) is possibly vertical at x = 2. Intervals of existence could be (−∞, 2) and (2, ∞). 41. One solution is given by the upper portion of the graph with domain approximately (0, 2.6). The other solution is given by the lower portion of the graph, also with domain approximately (0, 2.6). 42. One solution, with domain approximately (−∞, 1.6) is the portion of the graph in the second quadrant together with the lower part of the graph in the first quadrant. A second solution, with domain approximately (0, 1.6) is the upper part of the graph in the first quadrant. The third solution, with domain (0, ∞), is the part of the graph in the fourth quadrant. 43. Differentiating (x3 + y 3 )/xy = 3c we obtain xy(3x2 + 3y 2 y ) − (x3 + y 3 )(xy + y) =0 x2 y 2 3x3 + 3xy 3 y − x4 y − x3 y − xy 3 y − y 4 = 0 (3xy 3 − x4 − xy 3 )y = −3x3 y + x3 y + y 4 y = y 4 − 2x3 y y(y 3 − 2x3 ) = . 3 − x4 2xy x(2y 3 − x3 ) 44. A tangent line will be vertical where y is undefined, or in this case, where x(2y 3 − x3 ) = 0. This gives x = 0 and 2y 3 = x3 . Substituting y 3 = x3 /2 into x3 + y 3 = 3xy we get 1 1 x3 + x3 = 3x x 1/3 2 2 3 3 3 x = 1/3 x2 2 2 x3 = 22/3 x2 x2 (x − 22/3 ) = 0. Thus, there are vertical tangent lines at x = 0 and x = 22/3 , or at (0, 0) and (22/3 , 21/3 ). Since 22/3 ≈ 1.59, the estimates of the domains in Problem 42 were close. 45. Since φ (x) > 0 for all x in I, φ(x) is an increasing function on I. Hence, it can have no relative extrema on I. 46. (a) When y = 5, y = 0, so y = 5 is a solution of y = 5 − y. (b) When y > 5, y < 0, and the solution must be decreasing. When y < 5, y > 0, and the solution must be increasing. Thus, none of the curves in color can be solutions. y (c) 10 5 −5 5 t 47. (a) y = 0 and y = a/b. 5 Exercises 1.1 (b) Since dy/dx = y(a − by) > 0 for 0 < y < a/b, y = φ(x) is increasing on this interval. Since dy/dx < 0 for y < 0 or y > a/b, y = φ(x) is decreasing on these intervals. (c) Using implicit differentiation we compute d2 y = y(−by ) + y (a − by) = y (a − 2by). dx2 Solving d2 y/dx2 = 0 we obtain y = a/2b. Since d2 y/dx2 > 0 for 0 < y < a/2b and d2 y/dx2 < 0 for a/2b < y < a/b, the graph of y = φ(x) has a point of inflection at y = a/2b. (d) y y=a b y=0 x 48. (a) In Mathematica use Clear[y] y[x ]:= x Exp[5x] Cos[2x] y[x] y''''[x] − 20 y'''[x] + 158 y''[x] − 580 y'[x] + 841 y[x] // Simplify (b) In Mathematica use Clear[y] y[x ]:= 20 Cos[5 Log[x]]/x − 3 Sin[5 Log[x]]/x y[x] xˆ3 y'''[x] + 2xˆ2 y''[x] + 20 x y'[x] − 78 y[x] // Simplify Exercises 1.2 1 1 1 = we get c1 = −4. The solution is y = . 3 1 + c1 1 − 4e−t 1 1 2 2. Solving 2 = we get c1 = − e−1 . The solution is y = . 1 + c1 e 2 2 − e−(t+1) 3. Using x = −c1 sin t + c2 cos t we obtain c1 = −1 and c2 = 8. The solution is x = − cos t + 8 sin t. 1. Solving − 4. Using x = −c1 sin t + c2 cos t we obtain c2 = 0 and −c1 = 1. The solution is x = − cos t. 5. Using x = −c1 sin t + c2 cos t we obtain √ 3 1 1 c1 + c2 = 2 2 2 √ 3 1 − c1 + c2 = 0. 2 2 √ √ 3 3 1 1 Solving we find c1 = and c2 = . The solution is x = cos t + sin t. 4 4 4 4 6 Exercises 1.2 6. Using x = −c1 sin t + c2 cos t we obtain √ √ √ 2 2 c1 + c2 = 2 2 2 √ √ √ 2 2 − c1 + c2 = 2 2 . 2 2 Solving we find c1 = −1 and c2 = 3. The solution is x = − cos t + 3 sin t. 7. From the initial conditions we obtain the system c1 + c2 = 1 c1 − c2 = 2. Solving we get c1 = 3 2 and c2 = − 1 . A solution of the initial-value problem is y = 3 ex − 1 e−x . 2 2 2 8. From the initial conditions we obtain the system c1 e + c2 e−1 = 0 c1 e − c2 e−1 = e. Solving we get c1 = 1 2 and c2 = − 1 e2 . A solution of the initial-value problem is y = 1 ex − 1 e2−x . 2 2 2 9. From the initial conditions we obtain c1 e−1 + c2 e = 5 c1 e−1 − c2 e = −5. Solving we get c1 = 0 and c2 = 5e−1 . A solution of the initial-value problem is y = 5e−x−1 . 10. From the initial conditions we obtain c1 + c2 = 0 c1 − c2 = 0. Solving we get c1 = c2 = 0. A solution of the initial-value problem is y = 0. 11. Two solutions are y = 0 and y = x3 . 12. Two solutions are y = 0 and y = x2 . (Also, any constant multiple of x2 is a solution.) ∂f 2 = y −1/3 . Thus the differential equation will have a unique solution in any ∂y 3 rectangular region of the plane where y = 0. 13. For f (x, y) = y 2/3 we have 14. For f (x, y) = √ xy we have ∂f 1 = ∂y 2 x . Thus the differential equation will have a unique solution in any y region where x > 0 and y > 0 or where x < 0 and y < 0. 15. For f (x, y) = where x = 0. y ∂f 1 we have = . Thus the differential equation will have a unique solution in any region x ∂y x 16. For f (x, y) = x + y we have plane. 17. For f (x, y) = ∂f = 1. Thus the differential equation will have a unique solution in the entire ∂y x2 2x2 y ∂f = we have 2 . Thus the differential equation will have a unique solution in 4 − y2 ∂y (4 − y 2 ) any region where y < −2, −2 < y < 2, or y > 2. 7 Exercises 1.2 18. For f (x, y) = x2 ∂f −3x2 y 2 we have = 2 . Thus the differential equation will have a unique solution in 3 1+y ∂y (1 + y 3 ) any region where y = −1. y2 ∂f 2x2 y we have = 2 . Thus the differential equation will have a unique solution in 2 +y ∂y (x2 + y 2 ) any region not containing (0, 0). 19. For f (x, y) = 20. For f (x, y) = x2 y+x ∂f −2x . Thus the differential equation will have a unique solution in any we have = y−x ∂y (y − x)2 region where y < x or where y > x. 21. The differential equation has a unique solution at (1, 4). 22. The differential equation is not guaranteed to have a unique solution at (5, 3). 23. The differential equation is not guaranteed to have a unique solution at (2, −3). 24. The differential equation is not guaranteed to have a unique solution at (−1, 1). 25. (a) A one-parameter family of solutions is y = cx. Since y = c, xy = xc = y and y(0) = c · 0 = 0. (b) Writing the equation in the form y = y/x we see that R cannot contain any point on the y-axis. Thus, any rectangular region disjoint from the y-axis and containing (x0 , y0 ) will determine an interval around x0 and a unique solution through (x0 , y0 ). Since x0 = 0 in part (a) we are not guaranteed a unique solution through (0, 0). (c) The piecewise-defined function which satisfies y(0) = 0 is not a solution since it is not differentiable at x = 0. d tan(x + c) = sec2 (x + c) = 1 + tan2 (x + c), we see that y = tan(x + c) satisfies the differential dx equation. 26. (a) Since (b) Solving y(0) = tan c = 0 we obtain c = 0 and y = tan x. Since tan x is discontinuous at x = ±π/2, the solution is not defined on (−2, 2) because it contains ±π/2. (c) The largest interval on which the solution can exist is (−π/2, π/2). 27. (a) Since d 1 1 1 = y 2 , we see that y = − − = is a solution of the differential equation. dt t+c (t + c)2 t+c (b) Solving y(0) = −1/c = 1 we obtain c = −1 and y = 1/(1 − t). Solving y(0) = −1/c = −1 we obtain c = 1 and y = −1/(1 + t). Being sure to include t = 0, we see that the interval of existence of y = 1/(1 − t) is (−∞, 1), while the interval of existence of y = −1/(1 + t) is (−1, ∞). (c) Solving y(0) = −1/c = y0 we obtain c = −1/y0 and y=− 1 y0 = , −1/y0 + t 1 − y0 t y0 = 0. Since we must have −1/y0 + t = 0, the largest interval of existence (which must contain 0) is either (−∞, 1/y0 ) when y0 > 0 or (1/y0 , ∞) when y0 < 0. (d) By inspection we see that y = 0 is a solution on (−∞, ∞). 28. (a) Differentiating 3x2 − y 2 = c we get 6x − 2yy = 0 or yy = 3x. 8 Exercises 1.2 y (b) Solving 3x2 − y 2 = 3 for y we get y = φ1 (x) = 3(x2 − 1) , 3(x2 − 1) , −∞ < x < −1, y = φ2 (x) = − 3(x2 − 1) , y = φ3 (x) = 4 1 < x < ∞, y = φ4 (x) = − 3(x2 − 1) , Only y = φ3 (x) satisfies y(−2) = 3. 2 1 < x < ∞, -4 2 −∞ < x < −1. 4 x 2 -2 4 x -2 -4 (c) Setting x = 2 and y = −4 in 3x2 − y 2 = c we get 12 − 16 = −4 = c, so the explicit solution is y 4 y = − 3x2 + 4 , −∞ < x < ∞. 2 -4 -2 -2 -4 (d) Setting c = 0 we have y = 29. When x = 0 and y = or the black curve. 1 2 √ √ 3x and y = − 3x, both defined on (−∞, ∞). , y = −1, so the only plausible solution curve is the one with negative slope at (0, 1 ), 2 30. If the solution is tangent to the x-axis at (x0 , 0), then y = 0 when x = x0 and y = 0. Substituting these values into y + 2y = 3x − 6 we get 0 + 0 = 3x0 − 6 or x0 = 2. 31. The theorem guarantees a unique (meaning single) solution through any point. Thus, there cannot be two distinct solutions through any point. 32. Differentiating y = x4 /16 we obtain y = x3 /4 = x(x4 /16)1/2 , so the first function is a solution of the differential equation. Since y = 0 satisfies the differential equation and limx→0+ x3 /4 = 0, the second function is also a solution of the differential equation. Both functions satisfy the condition y(2) = 1. Theorem 1.1 simply guarantees the existence of a unique solution on some interval containing (2, 1). In this, such an interval could be (0, 4), where the two functions are identical. y 5 4 3 2 1 -4 2 -2 4x 2 4x y 5 4 3 2 1 -4 -2 33. The antiderivative of y = 8e2x + 6x is y = 4e2x + 3x2 + c. Setting x = 0 and y = 9 we get 9 = 4 + c, so c = 5 and y = 4e2x + 3x2 + 5. 34. The antiderivative of y = 12x − 2 is y = 6x2 − 2x + c1 . From the equation of the tangent line we see that when x = 1, y = 4 and y = −1 (the slope of the tangent line). Solving −1 = 6(1)2 − 2(1) + c1 we get c1 = −5. The antiderivative of y = 6x2 − 2x − 5 is y = 2x3 − x2 − 5x + c2 . Setting x = 1 and y = 4 we get 4 = −4 + c2 , so c2 = 8 and y = 2x3 − x2 − 5x + 8. 9 Exercises 1.3 Exercises 1.3 dP dP = kP + r; = kP − r dt dt 2. Let b be the rate of births and d the rate of deaths. Then b = k1 P and d = k2 P . Since dP/dt = b − d, the 1. differential equation is dP/dt = k1 P − k2 P . 3. Let b be the rate of births and d the rate of deaths. Then b = k1 P and d = k2 P 2 . Since dP/dt = b − d, the differential equation is dP/dt = k1 P − k2 P 2 . 4. Let P (t) be the number of owls present at time t. Then dP/dt = k(P − 200 + 10t). 5. From the graph we estimate T0 = 180◦ and Tm = 75◦ . We observe that when T = 85, dT /dt ≈ −1. From the differential equation we then have k= dT /dt −1 = = −0.1. T − Tm 85 − 75 6. By inspecting the graph we take Tm to be Tm (t) = 80 − 30 cos πt/12. Then the temperature of the body at time t is determined by the differential equation dT π = k T − 80 − 30 cos t dt 12 , t > 0. 7. The number of students with the flu is x and the number not infected is 1000 − x, so dx/dt = kx(1000 − x). 8. By analogy with differential equation modeling the spread of a disease we assume that the rate at which the technological innovation is adopted is proportional to the number of people who have adopted the innovation and also to the number of people, y(t), who have not yet adopted it. If one person who has adopted the innovation is introduced into the population then x + y = n + 1 and dx = kx(n + 1 − x), dt x(0) = 1. 9. The rate at which salt is leaving the tank is (3 gal/min) · A lb/gal 300 = A lb/min. 100 Thus dA/dt = A/100. 10. The rate at which salt is entering the tank is R1 = (3 gal/min) · (2 lb/gal) = 6 lb/min. Since the solution is pumped out at a slower rate, it is accumulating at the rate of (3 − 2)gal/min = 1 gal/min. After t minutes there are 300 + t gallons of brine in the tank. The rate at which salt is leaving is R2 = (2 gal/min) · The differential equation is A lb/gal 300 + t = 2A lb/min. 300 + t dA 2A =6− . dt 300 + t 11. The volume of water in the tank at time t is V = Aw h. The differential equation is then dh 1 dV 1 −cA0 = = dt Aw dt Aw 10 2gh =− cA0 Aw 2gh . Exercises 1.3 Using A0 = π 2 12 2 = π , Aw = 102 = 100, and g = 32, this becomes 36 dh cπ √ cπ/36 √ 64h = − h. =− dt 100 450 12. The volume of water in the tank at time t is V = 1 πr2 h = 1 Aw h. Using the formula from Problem 11 for the 3 3 volume of water leaving the tank we see that the differential equation is dh 3 dV 3 (−cAh = = dt Aw dt Aw 2gh ) = − 3cAh Aw 2gh . Using Ah = π(2/12)2 = π/36, g = 32, and c = 0.6, this becomes dh 0.4π 1/2 3(0.6)π/36 √ 64h = − h . =− dt Aw Aw To find Aw we let r be the radius of the top of the water. Then r/h = 8/20, so r = 2h/5 and Aw = π(2h/5)2 = 4πh...
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