Wiki - Emperor Puyi

Wiki - Emperor Puyi - general Zhang Xun. While living as a...

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Emperor Puyi By Patrick Campbell Emperor Puyi was the last emperor of China. Puyi was born on February 7, 1906 during the waning years of the Qing Dynasty. Chosen by Dowager Empress Cixi while on her deathbed, Puyi ascended the throne in December 1908 just shy of his 3rd birthday. Throughout his coronation in the Forbidden City the young boy kept crying and shouting, “I don't want to stay here, I want to go home.” The civil and military officials were stunned when they heard of this saying, for they thought it suggested that the dynasty would soon be over. They proved to be right as three years later the Qing Dynasty that had lasted 267 years collapsed when Yuan Shikai (the great general of the Beiyang army) took control of the city. The young emperor was allowed to remain in the Forbidden City as a figurehead, and was even briefly restored to the throne for twelve days in 1917 by the warlord
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Unformatted text preview: general Zhang Xun. While living as a pseudo prisoner in the palace, Puyis traditional Confucian education was supplemented by studies in western philosophies and languages. In 1924 Puyi was forced to leave the palace for the first time since becoming emperor and eventually settled in the Japanese protected Tianjin. In 1931, following the Japanese invasion of Manchuria, Puyi was installed as the ruler of Manchukuo. For the next decade Puyi served as a puppet of Imperial Japan though he retained the title of emperor. Once the communist came to power Puyi was captured and spent ten years in a reeducation camp in Fushun until he was declared reformed in 1959. The former emperor died 1967 after living his final years under government protection during the Cultural Revolution....
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course HS 500 taught by Professor Clarke during the Spring '08 term at BC.

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