Key Concepts-critical thinking

Key Concepts-critical thinking - Key Concepts assumptions...

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Key Concepts assumptions bias emotional appeals emotive language filter frame of reference generalizations point of view stereotypes What is “Critical Thinking”? One definition (there are many variations) of critical thinking is as follows: …the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action. Why “Critical Thinking”? In this course, in most of your courses, and in your life as a whole, you will be presented with ideas and arguments constructed from a particular perspective. Too often we believe what we read or hear, without question, especially if it comes from someone we consider an “expert” (like an author or college professor). I want you to view the information presented this semester with a “critical eye”. This does not mean that the information is flawed in some way, only that you need to consider it carefully, rather than simply accept
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Key Concepts-critical thinking - Key Concepts assumptions...

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