Simple Quiz 1 First Draft - Starla Eckhardt TA Danny...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

Starla Eckhardt, TA: Danny Cardoza, Sec 001, 12 February 2015, Simple Quiz FD #11When Americans look at other cultures' traditions and beliefs, they often wonder at the "imaginary world" that has been created, though they forget that they have just as many practices that don't make sense to others. The Himba "imaginary world" may seem illogical to them in their world of science, but makes sense when looked at through the other culture. Religion, specifically the relationship of the Himba with Mukuru and their ancestors, guides most of their actions. However, all people, no matter the culturebe it the Himba in Namibia, Americans, or Brigham Young Universityhave the ability to act as individuals. Thus, there are aspects of this "imaginary world" that cause people to come up with different conclusions and act in their own way based upon their personal experiences and what they have been taught.The Himba discuss many of their beliefs throughout the book, from bad hearts to spirits to marriage to omiti. Much of this is shown through examples in everyday life, and many explain it through their relationship with Mukuru and their ancestors. This is where most of the similarities end. Each person seems to have their own individual understanding of exactly why things happen and how events affect their spiritual standing. The only exception seems to be with omiti (the practice of hurting another person by imposing a malicious will), which the Himba usually accept as an all-encompassing answer. However, other ideas are allowed to stem about less common occurrences.In The Place of Stunted Ironwood Trees, when talking about a recent string of thefts, Crandall talks to three men, Kavetonwa, Masutwa, and a stranger, about what it means to have a good or bad heart. Kavetonwa states that, "Through our hearts we think and decide whether something is right or wrong" (Crandall 100), and goes on to say that these decisions are so strong that they "must be made in the strongest part of the body" (100), the heart. He adds that "the heart and the brain must work together" (100), and then gives an example about how his brain
Starla Eckhardt, TA: Danny Cardoza, Sec 001, 12 February 2015, Simple Quiz FD #12may come up with a plan to steal an ox, which will be sent to his heart for evaluation; a good heart will determine this thought to be wrong, though "most of our hearts don't act so quickly" (101); it is then the person's choice and responsibility to follow the heart. Kavetonwa also adds that a heart can change, though it is difficult for a bad heart to become good; connecting this to his religion, he states that following the counsel of a good heart is, "what Mukuru wants us to do" (101).Masutwa agreed with Kavetonwa, but added the aspect of omitiinto the equation. He believed that "evil people... have the power to place [strange] thoughts in our heads" (102). He added that "[his] father taught [him] that a bad heart no longer works. It doesn't endorse evil thoughts, but stands silent: a bad heart passes no judgement on thought" (102) and that

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture