Interview Assignment 4 - Starla Eckhardt TA Danny Cardoza...

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Starla Eckhardt, TA: Danny Cardoza, Sec 001, 14 April 2015, Interview Assignment #4 1 Throughout history, people all over the world have had to cope with many things, from harsh living conditions to hunger to death, and we still cope with such things today, though often on a larger or more personal scale. In the last hundred years or so, we as a society have been through two world wars, a multitude of natural disasters, an increase in crime, and the technological age, which came with pressures of its own. On top of all of this, every person has also had to cope with childhood and the process of growing up, with the many stresses and traumas that can occur during this time as we learn to cope with small, everyday things. It seems like the entire human existence must be coped with. However, as there are many types of people, the question of how this coping happens, and if it differs between genders, races, generations, and any people with different backgrounds, often comes up. Along with reading an article about the impact that infant death has had on Brazil, I read four articles about how normal, everyday people have coped with emergency situations. Contrasting these to the people that I have interviewed (two people each from three different generations, two men and four women), I would say that while all people cope using different tools, they would all agree that the best way to cope involves staying calm, thinking or planning your actions, and actively doing something. Four articles from Reader's Digest talked about heroic feats in which normal people saved the day in a crisis, from helping to move a trailer off of a train track (Free), to evacuating a burning building (Tirella), to rescuing a woman from an attacker (Rosellini), to saving children from a destroyed building (Wescott). The common theme among these articles seemed to be taking action, or doing something helpful or productive. Interestingly, I found this a common theme when talking to my oldest generation and my youngest generation; as all are white, LDS, and have grown up in or near Utah, the only real factor I could identify was age, or generation. Woody R. Knot, the first person I interviewed, talked about coping with the death of his wife and
Starla Eckhardt, TA: Danny Cardoza, Sec 001, 14 April 2015, Interview Assignment #4 2 how he needed "something to occupy [his] mind" (Knot), and this was found in macramé, or knot-tying, as well as teaching dance lessons and giving service, especially in emergency situations (Knot). Magdeline Noggle, who was in the oldest generation with Woody, talked about

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