3016 Business Style documentation

3016 Business Style documentation - A Guide to Business...

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Unformatted text preview: A Guide to Business Style Citation of Commonly Used Sources Adele H. Bealer, Graduate Instructor Writing 30 l 6 Business style is a citation style that is characterized by its straightforward presentation of source material and its simple punctuation. It is characterized by its use of footnotes (rather than the in-text citations used by MLA and APA), which provide source information at the bottom of the page on which that source is referenced. Business style also requires a bibliography at the end of your report, which typically lists in alphabetical order all of the sources which you consulted in the preparation of your report. The following listing shows the correct formatting for bibliographic references, with a footnote to indicate how that source would be referenced at the bottom of the page in your text. Note that each entry provides a basic pattern; use these patterns to guide your source citation, even if some of the elements listed are not available for your source. There are a few differences between bibliographic entries and your footnote citations: in the bibliography, begin each entry with the name of the author inverted (Last name, first). If you have more than one author, invert only the first author’s name. Page numbers are included in bibliographic entries only if the material being cited is part of a larger work (a selection in an edited book, or a iournal article). Book Title Author, Book Title, publisher, place of publication, year of publication.I Online Book Author, Book Title, publisher, place of publication, year of publication, <URL>, accessed on date.2 Article in Newspaper Author [if provided], “article title,” name of newspaper, date, section number, page number, column number.3 Article in an Online Newspaper Author [if provided], “article title," name of newspaper, date, <URL> accessed on tlate.4 ' Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything, Broadway Books, New York, 2003, p. 384. 2 William Still, The Underground Railroad, Porter & Coates, Philadelphia, l872, p. 207, <http://invictus.quinnipiac.edu/ugrrmain.html>, accessed on May 28, 2008. 3 Tom Lauricella, “In a World of Managed Accounts, Few One-of-a-Kinds,” The Wall Street journal, july 7, 2003, Sec. R, p. l, col. l. 4 Seth Schiesel, “In Frayed Networks, Common Threads,” The New York Times on the Web, <http://www.nytimes.com/2003l08l2 l Itechnology/circuits/Z l netthtml?th>, accessed on April 7, 2008. Article in a Magazine Author [if provided], “article title,” name of magazine, date, page number.5 Omit the comma between the article title and the name of the periodical if the article title ends with a question mark or an exclamation point.6 Article in an Online Magazine Author [if provided], “article title,” name of magazine, date, <URL>, accessed on date.7 Document or Full-Text Article Found via a Reference/ Library Database: Author, “article title,” name of journal, volume number, issue number, date, page numbers, name of database, database provider [if known], accessed on date.8 Quotation from a Secondary Source While it is always preferable to use original source material, sometimes it is necessary to use wording from a secondary source, a source that quotes the source you need. In that case, while the secondary source ONLY will appear in your bibliography, you will create a two-part note to acknowledge the original source AND the source you got it from. Try to include as much information as possible about the original source.9 Personal Interview or Conversation Name of person interviewed (title or affiliation if appropriate), personal interview, date.” Speech Name of speaker (title or affiliation if appropriate), “title of speech” [if known], speech given at type of meeting [conference, convention, symposium], place, date.” 5 “Budget Desktops,” Consumer Reports, June 2003, pp. 42-44. 6 Spencer E. Ante, “Why Count Your Own Beans?” BusinessWeek, ]une 23, 2003, pp. 78- 79. 7 “Know Your Digital Parasites,” Slate, August l2, 2003, <http:l/slate.msn.com/id/20869l l>, accessed on September I4, 2008. 3 Craig Thompson, AricRindfleisch, and Zeynep Arsel, “Emotional Branding and the Strategic Value of the Doppelganger Brand Image,” The journal of Marketing, Vol. 70, January 2006, pp. 50-74, Business Source Premier, EBSCOhost, accessed on October 22, 2008. 9 Robert]. Dolan and Hermann Simon, Power Pricing, Free Press, New York, I997, cited by [or quoted by] Jack Trout with Steve Rivkin, The Power of Simplicity, McGraw—Hill, New York, I999, p. 76. '0 Harold Smith (professor of management, University of Utah), personal interview, May 26, 2008. ” Ray jordan (Pfizer), “E-Mail Marketing and Privacy,” speech given at International Association of Business Communicators conference, Toronto, June I0, 2003. E-Mail Message Name of author (email address if ends with a company name), “subject line,” e-mail message, date.'2 World Wide Web Page Author [if provided], “title of document,” web page name, date created or last updated, <URL>, accessed on date.'3 If the date of creation or posting cannot be determined, then insert the abbreviation n.d. (no date)” Annual reports Company name, report title, <URL>, accessed on date.’5 Corporate homepage Company name, Homepage, date created, <URL>, accessed on date.” Financial web sources (non-subscription) “Company name,” financial database name, date, <URL>, accessed on date.'7 Subscription financial web sources accessed through the library databases Web source, “Company,” date, Database, database provider [if known], accessed on date.‘8 Note the change to note l7 if your source is accessed through a database.'9 ’2 Ann Valdez ([email protected]), “Taking the Spin Out of Corporate Communications,” e-mail message, july 9, 2008. ‘3 “Maxwell Announces New Health Benefit,” Maxwell Corp., November I3, 2004, <http://www.maxcorp.com/NEWS/2004/f93500.html>, accessed on july 8, 2008. '4 “Laser Vision Correction,” Lasik MD Vision, n.d., <http://www.lasikmd.ca/>, accessed on November 27, 2008. ’5 Nike, Inc. 2005 Annual Report, <http://www.nike.com/nikebiz/investors/annual_reportlar__05/index.jsp;bsessionid=GLW WBNC3SBQZYCQCGJDSF5AKAlZEQlZB>, accessed on November 25, 2005. 16 Bath and Body Works, Homepage, 2005, <httpzllwww.bathandbodyworks.com>, accessed on October 24, 2008. 17 “Ford Motor Company: Annual Financials,” Hoover’s Online, July 29, 2003, <http://www.hoovers.com/free/co/finlannual/xhtmmD=l0597>, accessed on October 29, 2008. 18 Datamonitor, “Albertson’s lnc.: Company Profile,” November 2004, Business Source Premier, EBSCOhost, accessed on November 3, 2008. 19 Hoover’s Online, “Ford Motor Company: Annual Financials,” july 29, 2003, Business Source Premier, EBSCOhost, accessed on October 29, 2008. Government publications on-line Government organization/source, “table, abstract, or Section,” Report or Publication Title, <URL>, accessed on date.20 On-Iine reference works Reference Work, “reference cited,” n.d., <URL>, accessed on date.“ Subsequent references: When a note refers to a source which was fully identified in the note immediately preceding the current one, you may shorten the subsequent note by the use of the abbreviation lbid. (which means “in the same place” in Latin). lbid. replaces all those elements that would be repeated in the subsequent note; new information (generally a new page number) is then appended to the citation. Do not italicize or underline ibid., and do not capitalize it except at the beginning of a citation. ‘ William A. Sabin, The Greg Reference Manual, lO‘l‘ ed., McGraw-Hill lrwin, New York. 2005, p. 503. 2 lbid., p. 490. [lbid. here represents everything in the previous note, except page no.] 3 lbid. [Here, ibid. represents everything in the previous note including the page no.] When a note refers to a work fully identified in a previous note but NOT the one immediately preceding it, the later note can be shortened as follows: Author’s surname, page number. 8Sabin, p. 503. [Refers to the same work by Sabin cited in full in an earlier note] Bibliography “Citing Select Business Sources Using MLA Style,” Coastal Carolina University, Kimbel Library, April 2, 2005, <http://www.coastal.edu/library/citing/businessmla.html>, accessed on November 26, 2005. Sabine, William A. The Gregg Reference Manual, l0Ch ed., McGraw—Hill lrwin, New York, 2005. “Using Chicago Style to Cite and Document Sources,” Online! A Reference Guide to Using Internet Sources, Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2003, <http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/online/cite7.html>, accessed on November 26, 2005. 20 US. Census Bureau, “Health lnsurance Historical Table l, 2000,” Health Insurance Coverage Status and Type of Coverage by Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin, I987 to I 999, <http://www.census.govlhhes/hithins/historical/hihisttllhtml>, accessed on October 3|, 2008. 21 Encyclopedia Britannica Online, “Walton, Samuel Moore,” n.d., <http://www.britannica.comleb/article-900284l >, accessed on October 3, 2008. ...
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