Exam 3 notes - Chapter 7 Telecommunication Systems enable the transmission of data over public or private networks Network a communications data

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Chapter 7 Telecommunication Systems : enable the transmission of data over public or private networks Network : a communications, data exchange, and resource-sharing system created by linking two or more computers and establishing standards, or protocols, so that they can work together Networks are differentiated by the following: Architecture: peer-to-peer, client/server Topology: bus, star, ring, hybrid, wireless Protocols: Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/ IP) Media: coaxial, twisted-pair, fiber-optic Network Architectures Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Network : any network without a central file server and in which all computers in the network have access to the public files located on all other workstations (Ex: Napster) Client/Server Network : a model for applications in which the bulk of the back0end processing, such as performing a physical search of a database, takes place on a server, while the front-end processing, which involves communicating with the users, is handled by the clients o Client : a computer that is designed to request information from a server o Server : a computer that is dedicated to providing information in response to external requests Network Operating System (NOS): occurs when the sending computer divides a message into a number of efficiently sized units called packets, each of which contains the address of the destination computer. Each packet is sent on the network and intercepted by routers. Router : an intelligent connecting device that examines each packet of data it receives and then decides which way to send it onward toward its destination.
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Figure 7.7 Network Topologies Bus : all devices are connected to a central cable, called the bus or backbone. Bus networks are relatively inexpensive and easy to install for small networks. Star : all devices are connected to a central device, called a hub. Star networks are relatively east to install and manage, but bottlenecks can occur because all data must pass through the hub. Ring : all devices are connected to one another in the shape of a closed loop, so that each device is connected directly to two other devices, one on either side of it. Ring topologies are relatively expensive and difficult to install, but they offer high bandwidth and can span large distances. Hybrid : groups of star-configured workstations are connected to a linear bus backbone cable, combining the characteristics of the bus and star topologies. Wireless : devices are connected by a receiver/transmitter to a special network interface card that transmits signals between a computer and a server, all within an acceptable transmission range. Network Topology
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course IS 3003 taught by Professor Rao during the Spring '08 term at The University of Texas at San Antonio- San Antonio.

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Exam 3 notes - Chapter 7 Telecommunication Systems enable the transmission of data over public or private networks Network a communications data

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